GOOD

Is No-Kill Really Such a No-Brainer?

The popular policy prescriptive for solving cities’ stray animal woes is not without its pet-loving critics.

No one likes this part of the job, but what happens next is sometimes worse. Illustration by Addison Eaton.

Most city employees have a lot on their plates. They hold public meetings, fix sidewalks, and maintain parks. They also have to kill cats and dogs.

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Vision Zero: Designing Streets to Save Lives

A Swedish design proposal to eliminate traffic fatalities is picking up steam around the world.

View of Gotgatan street in Stockholm. Photo via Holger.Ellgaard/Wikimedia Commons

The language we use influences how we think about the world around us. For example, in my first years of transportation advocacy I learned to use the word “crash” to describe vehicular collisions. I, like many Americans, had always used the word “accident,” a term which unwittingly affirms that vehicle collisions are unavoidable, unpreventable, and a fact of life. However, while most crashes are unintentional, they are not always unpreventable. The key to prevention is accepting that humans will definitely make mistakes and then designing the built environment accordingly.

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Surprise! Creativity in the Public Sector

Why a psychedelic cover page to a dry environmental impact report mesmerized the urban planning community

It was September 2014 and the urban planning community was astir with wonder. The reason? Not a proposed skyscraper or legislative victory, but the c­over page of an environmental impact report. The cover, designed by a CalTrans employee, depicted a psychedelic menagerie of clip-art-upon-gradient teeming with desert flora, fauna, solar panels, and various modes of transportation. The bewildering forms evoked the work of Lisa Frank, Sufjan Stevens circa 2012, and a small child using Microsoft Paint. We were confused, we were incredulous, and we were delighted.

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