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Cookstove With Simple Technology for High Environmental Impact in Haiti

The Adventure Project brings simple technology to families in Haiti for high-impact environmental and health benefits.


It’s always nice to have someone to look up to—and a project to look up to can be equally inspiring. This week, Designed Good is featuring The Adventure Project—an initiative that uses simple technology for high-impact environmental and health benefits. Over the past two years, The Adventure Project has brought 4,700 charcoal-efficient stoves to families in Haiti. The stoves show off one of the seemingly simpler feats in engineering, but the changes they make are sweeping. Each stove cuts charcoal use in half, which saves families 20 percent of their cooking expenses and saves six trees per year.

As children sit around the fire as their mothers cook dinner, inhaling the smoke equates to smoking two packs of cigarettes a day. The closed design of the charcoal-efficient stove reduces carbon emissions and drastically reduces health risks of those in the vicinity. The stoves themselves are also built by women in Port-au-Prince, providing a steady income and a means of reinvesting in their communities.

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A Biodegradable Doormat That Promotes Nonviolent Actions

This fairly normal domestic object–the doormat–has a clever catch phrase that serves as the answer to home intrusion.

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Hand in Hand: This Bar of Soap Protects Rainforests

Hand in Hand soap donates one bar of soap to children in Haiti for every bar sold.

Bill and Courtney of Hand in Hand are a husband-and-wife social entrepreneurship duo that takes the spotlight on Designed Good this week. The pair had been thinking about ideas for a sustainable business for years when they learned that water-related illnesses are responsible for 5 million deaths each year, 45 percent of which can be prevented by hand washing.

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Women in Peru's Sacred Valley Became Breadwinners by Making iPad Cases

13 women are weaving textiles for iPad cases to earn an income, reinvest in their families, and share a traditional art and skill.

In a small, impoverished community called Choquecancha, 13 women are weaving textiles to earn an income, reinvest in their families, and share a traditional art and skill that has been part of the Sacred Valley culture in Peru for centuries.

This community is 12,000 feet above sea level and two hours away from the nearest town by bus. One such bus ride was taken by Tina Novero, a scholar from San Francisco who came to the Peruvian high Andes to ask, “What does empowerment mean for women in this region?”

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Grenades for Good: Seedbombs Renew Urban Spaces and Home Gardens

Seedbombs are grenades for good—made out of clay, compost, and seeds—they are small balls that you can throw into urban spaces and home gardens alike.


You might be more used to combining war and the environment than you think. For instance, weeding your garden might feel like waging a war on your local environment. Forcing yourself to spend five fewer minutes in the shower might feel like an assault against your much-needed luxury time, and convincing your carpool driver to turn off the engine while waiting for the next person to hop in the SUV might feel like a constant battle.

This week, we unearthed a product that combines war and the environment in a way that’s a little more productive, and a lot less guilt-ridden: seedbombs.

Seedbombs are grenades for good—made out of clay, compost, and seeds—they are small balls that you can throw into urban spaces and home gardens alike to spread green.

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