GOOD

The Whitewashing Of Lacrosse

A new documentary brings lacrosse back to its original owners: the Iroquois

Two summers ago, for the first time ever, an international sporting event took place on indigenous lands. The World Indoor Lacrosse Championship was held on the Onondaga Reservation in upstate New York and was hosted by the Iroquois Nation, or, as they call themselves, the Haudenosaunee.

Today, lacrosse is thought of as white kids' sport played in prep schools in the Northeast, but the sport was invented by the Iroquois Nation some nine centuries ago. For that week in 2015, the sport was back on its home turf. (Spoiler alert: White people usurped that too.)

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Sports

One Humble Sugar-Free Drink Is Taking On The Soda Industry

“Yes, our product is more expensive than Diet Coke, but it's embarrassing to say—Diet Coke's cheaper than water”

Paddy Spence grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts halfway between mansions on Brattle Street and public housing half a mile in the other direction.

“I saw it all and pretty early on realized where I fit in,” says 49-year-old Spence. “My mom was a single mother who cleaned houses and worked office jobs for a living, and while our household was economically challenged, I still was able to attend a local private school on scholarship and saw how my affluent classmates lived, which was very different than my day-to-day existence.”

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Food

A Walk Along England’s Curry Row

We got a slice of the spice houses of Northeast England

The young waiter, in a purple button-up and matching tie, stood over our table at Tandoori International listing off the specials in the typical thick South Shields “Geordie” accent, as the vernacular of the northeast is known.

I asked how to spell the dish that I’d decided on, in order to keep notes on the meal.

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Food

Why Teaching Kids To Cook Is the Key To A Better Future

An initiative kicked off by star chef Alice Waters has taken on a life of its own

Food luminary Alice Waters has been the catalyst for a handful of our foodie movements over the last four decades. The owner and chef of Chez Panisse in Berkeley, California is known for her “farm-to-table” approach to feeding people and her own version of no child left behind, called The Edible Schoolyard Project. Through that program, kids from communities all across the United States are taught the value of planting, harvesting, preparing and then eating their own food—literally, consuming the fruits of their labor.

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Articles

The Vigilante Pastor

In a country ripped apart by war, Gennadiy Mokhnenko fights to protect his city and the children who live in it

Every day, Pastor Gennadiy Mokhnenko fights two wars. He tries to keep the Russian Army at bay from taking over his Ukranian home of Mariupol, and he tries to save children living in the streets from a life of drugs and inevitable death.

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Articles