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Alabama's New Immigration Law Is Worse Than SB1070. Where's the Outrage?

The new immigration law in Alabama is Arizona's bill on steroids. Why don't people seem to care?

Yesterday, Alabama signed HB 56 into law. “This is an Arizona bill with an Alabama twist,” Alabama Rep. Micky Hammon, one of the bill’s proponents, said. In other words, it's the harshest crackdown on undocumented immigrants in the country. But what I want to know is: Where's the outrage?

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South Carolina Prisoners Refused All Books but the Bible

The ACLU is suing a prison that is intentionally depriving its inmates of books.

A prison in South Carolina is taking heat for not allowing its prisoners to have reading materials that contain staples or "pictures of any level of nudity, including beachwear or underwear." The ACLU, which has filed a lawsuit against the Berkeley County detention center, says that the center's policy effectively eliminates most books and magazines from the inmates' literature options. The lawsuit also quotes an email from a Berkeley official to the Prison Legal News last year, which said, "[O]ur inmates are only allowed to receive soft-back Bibles in the mail directly from the publisher. They are not allowed to have magazines, newspapers, or any other type of books."

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Judge Gives Philly Area Students the Right to "Heart" Boobies

Two students who got in trouble last October for wearing the "I (heart) Boobies! (Keep A Breast)" bracelets are vindicated by a federal judge.

Thanks to a federal judge, students at Easton Area Middle School can once again express their love of boobies. Two students, 12-year-old Kayla Martinez and 13-year-old Brianna Hawk, got in trouble last October 28, Breast Cancer Awareness Day, for wearing the ubiquitous, awareness raising "I (heart) Boobies! (Keep A Breast)" bracelets. School officials banned the bracelets at the start of the school year, alleging they were a sexual double entendre and could encourage harassment. The ACLU filed suit on behalf of the girls and their parents, saying the ban infringed on their free speech rights.

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