GOOD

Inside the Digital Effort to Trace the Descendants of Freed Slaves

The Freedmen's Bureau Project will give millions of African-Americans the means to explore their ancestry.

Over 1.5 million documents that record the family histories of Civil War era African-Americans will be digitized and made available online for the first time, providing African-Americans with a vast and vital resource with which to research their family history. The effort, called The Freedmen’s Bureau Project, is being spearheaded by FamilySearch International, a nonprofit geneology organization, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, and the California African American Museum.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Study: Politicians Likelier to Engage with Voters of Their Race

New research from Yale finds that all politicians privilege "their own" when it comes to constituent engagement.


A new study out of Yale (PDF) about how politicians engage with potential voters has emerged just as Republicans and Democrats start seeking to register voters for the 2012 presidential election. Called "Do Politicians Racially Discriminate?" the research paper by professor Daniel Butler and his student David Broockman sought to find out if state legislators responded differently to constituents based on their race. Sadly, the answer to that question was a resounding yes.

Posing as two different constituents, one with the stereotypically black name DeShawn Jackson, and one with the stereotypically white name Jason Mueller, Butler and Broockman sent emails to thousands of state legislators asking for help registering to vote. The response wasn't partisan, it was racist, and all parties and races were to blame.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Poll: White Republicans Believe Their Children Will Have the Worst Future Ever

In a new poll from the Washington Post, white Republicans were far more likely than anyone else to fear America's future.


Though they're richer and vastly more culturally established than their minority counterparts, America's white Republicans fear the future in the United States far more than anyone else in the nation today, according to a new Washington Post-Kaiser-Harvard poll.

Asked if, "when your children are your age now," the standard of living will be better, the same, or worse, a full 60 percent of blacks said better, and only 18 percent said worse. Conversely, and more than a little bit surprisingly, almost a third of white respondents—31 percent—said they believe the future will be worse for their children. Only 36 percent percent of whites have a rosy outlook of the future.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles