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Don’t Get Mad … But Your Anger May Not Have Much To Do With Your Health

A new study shows that Asian societies do not experience the same anger-poor health link prevalent among Western populations

Heather Cho, the disgraced Korean Air vice president who resigned after she angrily demanded a plane return to its gate at John F. Kennedy airport due to the way she was served nuts onboard, is used as an example of the anger-high status link in Asian cultures

For some cultures, expressing your anger is linked to good health. Published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, a new study tracks Japanese and American subjects, studying their cardiovascular health and inflammation markers as well as their anger. What results is a clear distinction. Americans with greater expression of anger tend to have a higher biological health risk, while Japanese with higher anger expression enjoy a lower biological health risk.

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Can a Pledge to Cut the Cursing on Valentine's Day Squash Bullying?

Could reducing the number of students swearing cut down on bullying in schools? Anti-cursing activists think so.


Spend any amount of time in the average middle school hallway and your ears will sting from all the swearing. But students at Lott and Semmes Middle Schools in Mobile County, Alabama, are encouraging their classmates to drop the bad words on the one day of the year that love is supposed to rule: Valentine's Day.

A piece from today's New York Times details the multi-school no-cursing effort, and the $5,000 being spent to host California-based anti-cursing student activist McKay Hatch.

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