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Why Are Armenians in Turkey Protesting in Front of an Arts Museum?

This tourist attraction was once the site of a horrific tragedy.

Images of the Armenian intellectuals detained and deported from Istanbul on April 24, 1915. Image via Wikimedia Commons.

To commemorate the centennial anniversary of the Armenian genocide—a horrific event that took the lives of an estimated 1.5 million people—more than 100 Armenians in Turkey organized a demonstration in front of the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Art in Istanbul. Assembled in front of the building, many held signs that read, “recognize the genocide” or carried red carnations in their hands.

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How Environmentalism Can Foster Nation-Building

A reforestation program unites the Nakhchivan Autonomous Republic.

Anyone who manages to make their way to the isolated Nakhchivan Autonomous Republic in the southern Caucasus Mountains will find rolling, jagged terrain dotted with unexpected wonders. In biblical times, so the legends go, this was the land where Noah settled. Roaming across the peaks and plains, you’ll find a mountain with a gap in its peak supposedly caused by the Ark slamming through during its descent, ancient salt caverns so deep they’ve carved houses and hotels into the shafts, and hundreds of stone sheep carved by Turkic invaders centuries ago. But perhaps the most amazing, if overlooked, sites in the region are the small groves of weedy tree saplings popping up by the roadside. Although Nakchivan’s history is full of wonder, its recent past is one of strife, which, over the past 30 years, stripped away almost every piece of wood in the countryside. Yet, despite continued hardships, the peoples of this small and secluded part of the world are, of their own accord and powers, bringing back their lost forests.

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