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Lately, art history majors have become something of a pop culture punching bag. Not only has the phrase become short-hand for “unemployable in today’s economy," they’ve also been ridiculed by President Barack Obama on national television. But will the gentle art of aesthetic study finally get the last laugh?

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To Fight Sexism, This Woman Recreated Art Masterpieces—with Barbies

The world’s most revered paintings now finally feature women (dolls).

Image via Catherine Thery Facebook embed

Barbies: one of the world’s most cherished (and beautifully mock-able) toys. While Barbies of the 1980’s might have accomplished such heroic feats as “getting a haircut” or “sitting in a chair,” French artist Catherine Thery had a slightly different plan for them in 2015. In a recent exhibit at the French gallery Teodora Galerie, Thery reimagined some of the world’s greatest artistic masterpieces—this time using Barbies.

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Go Inside the Haunted Museum Getting Jaded New Yorkers Excited About Holographic Art

The Hologram Center’s “Holohouse” lets visitors play with, and learn about, a uniquely modern form of artistic expression.

Castle William on Governor's Island, image via Wikicommons

New York City is huge. 8.4 million people huge to be exact, and, especially in the summer, it can feel like they are all squished directly next you on the subway. If you’re new to the city you might be unaware that just a quick boat ride from Brooklyn Bridge Park there’s a literal island of calm amongst the madness. First “discovered” in the 1600s by Dutch settlers, Governors Island was an important strategic base during the Civil War, and, later in the 20th century, home to the U.S. Coast Guard. In the 90s much of the area was turned into a national park (and occasional summer concert venue), and today those who want a taste of culture sans the lines come to the island to relax, take in the public art, and even catch a few ghosts. Yes! It’s been rumored that parts of the island are haunted—especially the historic Nolan Park area. It’s here that one of the world’s only holographic museums has set up shop for the summer, bringing ephemeral art to match the translucent specters its host destination is known for. Now in its second year, visitors to the Holocenter House will be able to see, touch, and even walk through a wide array of holograms created by some of the pioneers of the art form. A true passion project by its creators, the museum has already succeeded in both turning an otherwise overlooked NYC landmark into a fun (and spooky) summer destination, and promoting while preserving an art form many have overlooked.

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An Artistic Way to Master Surfing

A French company’s jaw-dropping surfboards feature iconic Renaissance artwork.

For those who would rather be hitting the beaches than the history books, a new line of surfboards promises to enlighten you about European Renaissance painting while you catch that radical wave. Boom-art, the French skateboarding company known for their locally crafted goods and rare limited editions, has linked with UWL Surfboard to create a series based on some of the Late Medieval period’s most vivid designs. The collector’s item surfboards, all handmade in France, feature such iconic images as The Lady and the Unicorn, based on a series of six tapestries woven in Flanders in the 1500s on wool and silk, and a set of three boards—which together form a triptych of early Netherlandish master Hieronymus Bosch’s The Garden of Earthly Delights. Sculpted from polyester resin and hand-molded polyurethane foam, each set is individually numbered in an edition of only 10.

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Long-Lost Hungarian Artwork Discovered...While Watching Stuart Little?

An art researcher spots missing Hungarian painting in the background of the 1999 family classic.

Screenshot courtesy Hyperallergic and Youtube

It was 2009. There Gergely Barki sat, watching Stuart Little, enjoying some quality time with his young daughter Lola nestled in his lap, when the researcher and art historian spotted something so startling that he nearly toppled his kid from her perch. In the background of a particularly adorable scene featuring the entire Little family convened in front of the fireplace, Barki spied, mounted above the mantel, a painting by Hungarian artist Róbert Berény. The artwork, “Sleeping Lady with Black Vase” (1927-1928), had last been exhibited in 1928 in Hungary before being sold to an unidentified individual, and had vanished from the country and public awareness, sometime around World War II, Barki estimated. Berény had been part of the Hungarian avant-garde collective Group of Eight, or The Eight, in the onset of the 20th century, and instrumental in bringing exhibitions of modernist art to Hungary.

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