GOOD

Bring GOOD Ideas for Cities to Your City: Download Our Toolkit

We've published a toolkit allowing anyone to organize events where local creatives team up with civic leaders to solve real-life urban challenges.

Since 2008, we've been we've been hosting GOOD Ideas for Cities events across the country, where local creatives team up with civic leaders to solve real-life urban challenges. The initiative has resulted in dozens of implemented solutions, from a board game that helps house the homeless in L.A., to a neighborhood revitalization project in Dallas, to a network of urban beacons which connects St. Louis both physically and virtually.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

GOOD Ideas for Cities: Supporting Food Truck Culture In New Orleans

Vendors and creatives have devised a plan to combat and alter the archaic laws suppressing the growth of the food truck community in New Orleans.

In recent years, New Orleans has become an urban incubator for creative ideas, drawing artists and entrepreneurs together to help guide the city towards a positive future. This meeting-of-the-minds atmosphere has revealed a simple truth about the city: New Orleans has a lot of archaic laws in dire need of a modern overhaul.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

GOOD Ideas for Cities: Three Ideas for Venice, Italy

At an event held at the 13th International Architecture Biennale in Venice, Italy, three teams of architects presented their concepts for the city.

A few months ago GOOD Ideas for Cities was selected as one of 124 grassroots urban initiatives in the exhibition Spontaneous Interventions: design actions for the common good, the U.S. delegation to the 13th International Architecture Biennale in Venice, Italy. As part of the exhibition, we were asked to organize an event pairing three Venetian architecture firms with challenges proposed by three local urban leaders. Here are the ideas for Venice they proposed. If you can get to Venice by this weekend, the Biennale closes on Saturday, November 25.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

GOOD Ideas for Cities: Making Walkability Fun

How to encourage more people to walk? Start a series of neighborhood walking tours led by kids.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9GybIkxfRxw

A neighborhood designed for walking provides important health and environmental benefits to its residents, not to mention a greater sense of community. Yet many Cincinnati residents still turn to their cars to run even the shortest errands. How can cities encourage their neighborhoods to make walkability a priority? As part of GOOD Ideas for Cities Cincinnati, Scout Camp proposes a concept that they think will get more people walking and thinking about walkability: A series of neighborhood walking tours led by local kids. As the team surveyed pedestrian advocacy groups, they realized that most walkability campaigns were missing a crucial message: Walking is fun.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

GOOD Ideas for Cities: Promoting Fresh Food Access

Adults living in neighborhoods with no supermarkets have significantly higher obesity rates. How to increase their availability to healthy foods?

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrziEBKUxfY

Studies have shown that the number of grocery stores in a neighborhood has a direct correlation to the rate of obesity in its residents. Without a nearby institution providing fresh produce, shoppers tend to make unhealthy eating choices. How can neighborhoods without a supermarket increase their access to healthy foods?

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

GOOD Ideas for Cities: Uniting Cultural Institutions

How can local creative institutions work together to attract talent? A group of 20-somethings from Cincinnati has an idea.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQcMmvxL8yA

Cincinnati has hundreds of thriving art and design organizations, but the city itself is segmented into different neighborhoods, meaning residents have a difficult time getting the big picture of the city's cultural vibrancy. How can the local arts scene become both a source of innovation and an economic driver for the city?

Keep Reading Show less
Articles