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The Story Behind I AM THAT GIRL

Alexis Jones moved back into her childhood room, but her life was far from kids’ stuff.

Photo by Jersean Golatt

In 2012, it looked like Alexis Jones had it all. She’d founded I AM THAT GIRL, a nonprofit she calls the “badass 21st-century version of Girl Scouts.” She lived in Los Angeles, had support from entertainment industry friends like Kristen Bell and Sophia Bush, who’d rushed Jones in her sorority before her One Tree Hill days. Jones was on the road as an empowerment speaker 250 days a year, for four years. She had just landed a book deal—a dream of hers—to write the manifesto for I AM THAT GIRL.

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Enough of the “Me First” Economy, It's Time for “We First”

What the hell is contributory consumption? It's Simon Mainwaring's crazy idea for transforming our economy—and it just might work.

I told Simon Mainwaring he's out of his mind. He took it well, as a sign that he might be thinking big enough. His new book, which is as much a social media campaign to change business as we know it, is out this week. And that makes sense. We First: How Brands & Consumers Use Social Media to Build a Better World is a call to arms, to inspire customers to use their newfound Twitter power to make companies serve the world at large as well as their investors.

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Skype's New Education Platform Connects Classrooms Around the Globe

Teachers have long embraced Skype. Now the company is embracing them back with special features for educators.


Good news for teachers looking to collaborate with their colleagues in other parts of the world. Skype has a new free service just for educators called Skype in the classroom, "a free global community created in response to, and in consultation with, the growing number of teachers" using the tool to help students learn.

Teachers already access the eight-year-old service for joint projects, global language exchanges, and guest lectures, but have had a hard time using it to find like-minded collaborators. Skype in the classroom solves that challenge by letting a teacher specify what grade or subject she teaches, and what kinds of projects she's interested in working on together, when she first sets up a profile.

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