GOOD

Best of 2013: The Top Nine Public Interest Design Milestones

Building on our review of PublicInterestDesign.org’s 2013 predictions for the public interest design field, today we’re highlighting the milestones from this past year. The list looks beyond individual design projects and instead toward initiatives with far-reaching consequences for the field—and, in some cases, the world.

Building on our review of PublicInterestDesign.org’s 2013 predictions for the public interest design field, today we’re highlighting the milestones from this past year. The list looks beyond individual design projects and instead toward initiatives with far-reaching consequences for the field—and, in some cases, the world. From a glossy magazine that dedicated an entire issue to good design, to a glossary that cuts through the jargon, to several groundbreaking events and a new bar for training the next generation in the art and science of human-centered design, here are our top 10 public interest design initiatives of 2013.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

A Look Back at our Public Interest Design Predictions for 2013

For PublicInterestDesign.org’s third annual year in review series, we’re chronicling initiatives shaping the field of public interest design. As was the case in previous years, this is not an exercise in trend-spotting, but instead a meditation initiatives poised to advance a growing field at the intersection of design and social change.

For PublicInterestDesign.org’s third annual year in review series, we’re chronicling initiatives shaping the field of public interest design. As was the case in previous years, this is not an exercise in trend-spotting, but instead a meditation initiatives poised to advance a growing field at the intersection of design and social change.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Ordinary Citizens Catalyzing Change: A 'People's History' of 2013

The real story of 2013 was "ordinary people" in the streets who challenged injustice and worked for "good."



This year has been full of examples of people making history. Although newspapers and textbooks often focus on political and military leaders, the real story was with "ordinary people" in the streets who challenged injustice and worked for "good."

At the Zinn Education Project, our goal is to help teachers introduce these stories from a people's perspective. Teaching outside of the textbook and the mainstream news helps students see the roles they can play in making the world a better place.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

What I Learned in 2013: “Moments of Awe Make Us Better People”

…regular incidences of awe, not only provided a kind of necessary catharsis, but also left subjects as fundamentally better people.

The Existentialist philosopher Camus said, “Life should be lived to the point of tears.” He was onto something. The pull towards transcendence reveals a fundamental human need to marvel, to become overwhelmed, to be flooded by cascading waves of meaning. In Religion for Atheists, the philosopher Alain De Botton wrote that secular institutions need to do a better job at creating spaces for non-believers to experience a kind of “mindgasmic,” aesthetic sublime. Human beings don't need to believe in God in order to experience this sort of nourishment—the symphonic beauty of cathedrals or rocket ships will do just fine. But why does the secular world require spaces for reverential awe?

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Winter 2013: The Human Possibility Issue

Even the art historians among you probably won’t notice that the cover of our just-released issue, illustrated by Ping Zhu, is a subtle riff on...

Even the art historians among you probably won’t notice that the cover of our just-released issue, illustrated by Ping Zhu, is a subtle riff on a Diego Rivera mural. We discovered the image during the making of our Winter Edition when we were looking for some way to pay homage to Mexico City, which garners the top spot in our GOOD City Index. The Mexican-born Rivera’s 1931 The Making of a Fresco Showing the Building of a City seemed to do just that with its representation of Rivera and his crew assembling a mural of a modern, industrial city. If you look at the middle of the second level of scaffolding from the top, you can actually spot the portly painter himself, palette and brush in hand. The icon communicates a quiet calm in the midst of the frenzied assistants, engineers, and plasterers, bringing the work, within the work, to life.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles