GOOD

Hawaiian Lawmakers Say “Aloha” to 100 Percent Renewable Energy by 2045

Hawaii’s plans to go all-green mean it’s one state down, fourty-nine to go.

image via (cc) flickr user asheshwor

The green energy revolution is in full swing. Look around and you’ll see entire cities—and even countries—committing themselves to renewable power in the coming decades. Advances in wind, solar, and even wave power technology have inspired communities to explore the process of weaning themselves off fossil fuels in favor of more ecologically sound sources of energy. And while the renewable power industry (or, industries, as the case may be) is still very much in flux as a whole, the continued momentum toward the adoption of green tech has moved the dream of environmentally friendly energy policy away from “wishful fantasy,” and well towards “plausible inevitability.”

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

From Kansas to Kenya, Biochar Can Capture Carbon and Improve Soil

Biochar is a version of charcoal that helps permanently capture the carbon that plants suck from the air.


One of the best short-term strategies for fighting climate change is to stop burning agricultural waste out in the open. But under the right conditions, disposing of farm waste by turning it into biochar, a form of charcoal, can both sequester carbon and improve soil. On farms from Kansas to Kenya, innovators are creating stoves to help farmers take the greatest advantage of the resources they already have on their land.

Biochar is made by heating wood, corn stalks, manure, or a variety of other materials in a chamber devoid of oxygen. While a typical fire would force the carbon in the biological materials to join with oxygen to produce carbon dioxide, a biochar system allows more of the carbon—anywhere from 10 to 50 percent—to stay put. Even after farmers mix biochar with soil, the carbon remains stable and will stay in the ground for hundreds, even thousands, of years. All that carbon could be going to the atmosphere, which means biochar helps permanently capture the carbon that plants suck from the air.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles