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L’Oreal Forgoes Animal Testing by 3D-Printing Human Skin

To save animals (and money), the cosmetic company turns to bio-manufactured skin samples.

Organovo Skin

Ever since testing on animals fell out of fashion, cosmetic companies have struggled to discover ethical ways to test new products. Recently, L’Oreal partnered with Organovo, a bioprinting specialist, and announced a solution to the dilemma: they would start 3D printing their own human skin.

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Are These Self-Propelled Micro-Machines The Future Of Medicine?

Tiny “micromotors” just made their first trip through a living body, and that might only be the beginning.

nanomachine image from shutterstock

From 1966’s The Fantastic Voyage to Marvel’s upcoming Ant Man, we’ve spent decades entertaining ourselves with fantastical stories about science’s ability to make big things small, and small things extraordinary. Now, in a case of life imitating art, we may be poised on the cusp of a nano-revolution that breaks free from science fiction, and into the realm of science fact.

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Bacteria-Grown Fashion, Anyone?

Sammy Wells’ “Skin” project experiments with biotechnology and 3D printing to create sustainable, wearable objects.

Photos courtesy Sammy Jobbins Wells

Sammy Jobbins Wells’s “Skin” project is like something out of a futuristic Project Runway challenge, featuring an angular, wearable object fashioned out of textiles grown from live bacteria colonies—a DIY microbial statement piece, if you will. It’s like a space-age sun visor connected to an oversized geometric belt, creating a single structure that Wells says was inspired by animal bone corsets of the 17th and 18th centuries.

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Feast Your Eyes: The Atlas of Genetically Modified Crops

Where in the world are genetically modified crops grown?


Yesterday, the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications, a nonprofit organization funded in large part by the biotech industry, issued a new report on the status of genetically modified crops around the world.

The Economist has used ISAAA's data to make a map showing where in the world GM crops are grown. As you can see, the United States is by far the leader in the field, with 165 million acres (66.8 million hectares) of GM crops under cultivation, an increase of nearly 7 million acres on 2009 levels.

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Winning the Future with Salmon

That line that got the most laughs during Obama's State of the Union actually raises an important issue about our broken food regulatory system.


Immediately after President Obama finished his State of the Union address last night, NPR asked listeners to summarize his speech in three words. In the word cloud they generated from the 4,000 responses received (below), the word "salmon" looms rather large—larger than "jobs," much larger than "innovation," and much, much larger than "Sputnik."

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