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Germany Plans to Give Dozens of Military Bases Back to Nature

The country will turn thousands of acres once reserved for training soldiers into sanctuaries reserved for protecting wildlife.

image via (cc) flickr user justinwkern

“Old soldiers,” explained acclaimed general Douglas MacArthur, during his iconic farewell speech to Congress, “never die; they just fade away.”

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Can Eagles and Wind Turbines Coexist?

Both wind turbines and birds rely on the power of air currents to move them. That means that as more wind turbines are built, the towers claim...


Both wind turbines and birds rely on the power of air currents to move them. That means that as more wind turbines are built, the towers claim an increasing percentage of space once reserved only for avian flight. Some of the best sites for wind farms fall in the migratory paths of birds: The same wind currents attract both, and the birds end up killed. Those casualties are a particular problem when the species threatened are the same ones the government has decided to protect.

The federal government is in the process of debating how many eagles a wind farm in Oregon should be permitted to "take"—meaning disturb, injure, or kill. If the Fish and Wildlife Service grants a take permit to the West Butte Wind project, it will be the first ever awarded to a wind farm. In December, the agency published its preliminary assessment of the permit application, which would extend for five years, and the window for comments closed last week. West Butte Wind Power is asking for a permit covering one to two eagle takings over the 20-to-30-year lifespan of the project. In its draft assessment, the FWS estimates that anywhere between zero and 17 eagles could be significantly harmed.

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From Prehistoric Times to Steven Tyler: Our Enduring Fascination with Feathers

Humans have been using feathers for their own adornment for thousands of years. But the latest trends reveal our changing relationship with birds.

Thankfully, it's not just Steven Tyler who’s nurturing an obsession with feathers this summer.

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Apparently some 90,000 migratory birds die each year by crashing into buildings. But today, Treehugger reports on the Audobon Society's Lights Out campaign, an effort to help out the many migratory bird species that fly through New York City each fall. Numerous city skyscrapers, including icons such as the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building, will be dimming their lights in an effort to reduce the number of birds that are killed in collisions each year. We think the idea of corporate behemoths like Time Warner flipping the switch to help out a fellow species is a good one. In addition to energy savings, it highlights how seemingly small changes can have an amplified effect.

The post includes information on changes you can make in your own building, whether it be a low-rise or a high-rise.

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