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Do Rich White Kids Automatically Think They're Harvard Material?

According to counselors, low-income black students need to be talked up into applying to elite schools. Well-off white students need talking down.

High school guidance counselors and college admissions officers need to adjust their college counseling approach depending on a student's racial and socioeconomic differences. At least that's the thinking in a piece from the Chronicle of Higher Education, "Redefining Admissions 'Success' For Black Males," which spotlights some of the dialogue that took place Monday at the regional Potomac & Chesapeake Association for College Admission Counseling's annual conference. Counselors and college admissions staff are thinking through needed shifts in their approach to both underrepresented groups, like black males, and groups that historically have had more access to higher education, like wealthy white students.

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Spike Lee Wants More Black Male Teachers

Forget business, law, and medicine. With black men making up only 1.7 percent of American school teachers, they need to head to the classroom.


Can filmmaker Spike Lee encourage black male college graduates to "do the right thing" and go into teaching? The famous director teamed up with Education Secretary Arne Duncan yesterday at the nation's only all black male college campus, Morehouse College. Together they issued the call for more black men to give back to their communities by heading to teach in a K-12 classroom.

The town hall meeting and discussion was part of the Department of Education’s TEACH campaign, which hopes to raise awareness of the teaching profession and inspire Americans to step up and make a difference in the classroom. Given the shockingly low numbers of black men teaching in public schools, the campaign couldn't be more timely.

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The Black Youth Project Adds a New Voice to the Education Reform Conversation

Want to close the achievement gap? Pay attention to what black youth think.

The political scientist Cathy Cohen leads the Black Youth Project. She tells GOOD about the project's new educational resources, and what black youth have to say about schools.

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