GOOD

California Plans to Offer Free Solar Panels to Its Poorest Citizens

It may not be the “Sunshine State,” but when it comes to responsible solar energy, California is beginning to see the light.

image via (cc) flickr user ucirvine

While the sun may shine on each and every one of us equally, so far solar power has largely been a much less democratic affair. As solar energy panels become more and more efficient, their application, per a 2013 Center for American Progress study, remains mostly limited to middle-class homes with a median income of between $40-90,000. But a new plan in California will bring free solar power to its poorest citizens, saving each of them hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars in electrical costs.

Keep Reading
Articles

Oakland Getting First Urban Network of CO2 Sensors

Oakland's extensive network of CO2 detectors should help us figure out whether California's new cap-and-trade system is working.

Keep Reading
Articles

Cap and Trade Is Dead. Now What?

Putting a price tag on pollution isn't solving our climate-change woes. It's time to invest our muscle—and money—in breakthrough innovation.

Keep Reading
Articles

The Numbers Don't Lie: The Elections Weren't a Referendum on the Climate Bill Midterm Elections Not Referendum on Climate Policy, Statistics Say

You'd think by reading the headlines that the Democrats' attempt to create climate change legislation directly caused the massive power shift in the House. It didn't.

A headline on Politico this morning crowed "Greens desperate to avoid blame." You'd think by reading that that the Democrats' feckless attempt to create climate change legislation directly caused the massive power shift in the House.

Except it didn't.

Keep Reading
Articles