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A College Degree in Three Years? Why America Needs to Get on Board

Three-year degree programs save money and help students get on with their lives, but American students aren't signing up. They should be.

You'd think that given the spiraling cost of college, American students would jump at the chance to finish up school in three years instead of the typical four. With a three-year accelerated degree, parents have to fork over less cash for tuition and room and board, the family's loan burden is lighter, and students can get on with their career plans earlier. How does this not make sense? But despite the best efforts of both public and private universities to promote accelerated programs, students are sticking with the four-year college tradition. That's too bad because a three-year degree is a smart idea that we should be adopting.

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UCLA Student's Anti-Asian YouTube Rant: Do Colleges Need Mandatory Diversity Classes?

UCLA junior Alexandra Wallace's anti Asian rant raises the question—should colleges teach how to work with people from diverse backgrounds?


A UCLA student is in hot water after filming a disturbing anti-Asian rant and posting it online. Last Friday, political science major Alexandra Wallace taped an almost three-minute video called "Asians in the Library," and over the weekend, it went viral on YouTube. In the video she attacks Asian students for everything from talking on their cell phones to having elderly relatives come visit. Although the university has condemned her tirade, the incident raises the question, what should colleges do foster a truly inclusive learning environment and prepare students for a diverse world?

Wallace complains about "these hordes of Asian people that UCLA accepts into our school every single year," and then bashes them for their so-called bad manners. She demonstrates her "good" American manners by insensitively criticizing Asian students who used the phone after the tsunami hit Japan saying, "I swear they're going through their whole families just checking on everybody from the tsunami thing."

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