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Unless you've been living under a rock for the past year, you know who Greta Thunberg is. But depending on your chosen media and information outlets, what think you know about her might be totally false.

I've perused comments on articles about Thunberg's climate change activism and have seen the same false statements about her over and over again. Here are some actual cut-and-pasted comments (misspellings included) from just one article in the past week:

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The Planet

Millions of people in over 150 countries across the globe marched for lawmakers and corporations to take action to help stop climate change on Friday, September 20.

The Climate Strikes were organized by children around the world as an extension of the of the "Fridays for Future" campaign. Students have been walking out of classrooms on Fridays to speak out about political inaction surrounding the climate crisis.

"We need to act right now to stop burning fossil fuels and ensure a rapid energy revolution with equity, reparations and climate justice at its heart," organizers say.

There's no doubt the visual images from the marches send a powerful message to those on the ground but especially those watching from around the world. GOOD's own Gabriel Reilich was on the scene for the largest of the Climate Strikes. Here are 18 of the best signs from the Climate Strike march in New York City.

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Photo by Casey Horner on Unsplash

As world leaders meet to discuss new ways to tackle climate change at the U.N. Climate Action Summit, they might miss one very big part of healing nature – nature. In a new short film, youth climate change activist Greta Thunberg and George Monbiot, a writer for the Guardian, talked about how we need to use nature as a solution to climate change.

There's a huge push to curb emissions, but it's not the be all end all of handling climate change; we also need to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. While we don't have technology to do that for us, there is another solution. "There is a magic machine that sucks carbon out of the air, costs very little, and builds itself. It's called a tree," Monboit says in the film. Researchers found that we could get rid of two-thirds of the carbon dioxide that we've emitted during the industrial era just by growing trees. That amounts to 205 billion tons of carbon. Right now, deforestation of tropical forests is responsible for 20% of current greenhouse emissions.

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The Planet

Eden Reforestation Projects (Eden) — a non-profit organization whose mission is to provide poverty relief by employing local villagers in Haiti, Madagascar, and Nepal to help with reforestation — recently announced they've planted 250 million trees around the world.

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Scotland just became the first country to declare a climate emergency.

“They want governments around the world to declare a climate emergency. They say that’s what the science tells us, and they are right.”

Getty Images

If there was ever a time to panic about climate change, it would be now. Temperatures have demonstrably risen over the past decades, and in October, the United Nations warned that we only had 12 (now 11) years until climate change becomes irreversible. It’s clear that we should have taken action a long time ago, but at this point, we have to effect change ASAP. Luckily, some countries are starting to realize this—like Scotland.

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Articles

A million students took to the streets demanding action on climate change. Here are 18 of their best signs.

“Yo mama is so polluted, she’s literally dying. Save Mother Nature.”

Photo by Saeed Khan / Getty Images

According to a 2018 report from the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) world leaders only have 11 more years to significantly reduce the production of greenhouse gasses to avoid a climate disaster.

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