GOOD

You Can Extract the DNA of a Strawberry by Making This Delicious Cocktail

Who could have guessed biology would taste this good?

image via youtube screen capture

DNA is not usually the sort of thing I think of as a delicious way to relax at the end of a long day, but that’s probably because I’m not a synthetic biologist. Oliver Medvedik, on the other hand, is, and in this TED-produced video, the co-founder of New York community biolab GenSpace demonstrates how to extract the deoxyribonucleic acid from a common strawberry by making a pretty decent looking cocktail. All you need are frozen strawberries, pineapple juice, a filter, and some high-proof alcohol. It’s surprisingly simple:

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Irish Whiskey Cocktails to Celebrate a Great Drinking Holiday

Welcome to Buy You a Drink, where GOOD’s resident mixologist offers intoxicating beverages in tune with the times. This week: Irish whiskey...

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Bubbly Cocktails to Sip While Rush Limbaugh Fizzles

Raise a glass to Sandra Fluke—or drink our custom cocktails to the demise of Rush's career.


Welcome to Buy You a Drink, where GOOD’s resident mixologist selects the libations to pair with each week’s newsmakers. This week: cocktails perfumed by the sweet smell of schadenfreude.

The past 10 days of media scandal have provided me the rare and exciting opportunity to define the boundaries of my personal moral code. As it turns out, I’m fundamentally opposed to dancing on the graves of the recently deceased—even if the deceased were scum-sucking bottom feeders like Andrew Breitbart and you swear the grave-dancing is an homage to scum-suckery itself. But when it comes to living assholes, I’m all in favor of a little schadenfreude. And if the health of Rush Limbaugh’s radio program really is in jeopardy, then pardon me while I lace up my dancing shoes.

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Food for Thinkers: Sputnik Hotdogs

Space archaeologist Dr. Alice Gorman looks at the cultural history of food shaped like spacecraft.


Dr. Alice Gorman is a space archaeologist at Flinders University in Adelaide, Australia, and the author of an excellent blog, Space Age Archaeology, where she posts about extra-terrestrial mining, abandoned Venusian probes, space beer, and more.

As part of Food For Thinkers, Gorman has turned her attention to the edible culture of the space age, with a post about "the influence space exploration has had on terrestrial food." In particular, she is interested in the history of food shaped like Sputnik: recipes and dishes that, she writes "can be regarded as a sort of performance, half way between tangible and intangible heritage, as they exist only in the moment of their manufacture and disappear in the act of consumption." She writes:

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Adventures in Food Design: An Interview with Sam Bompas, Jellymonger

In which Bompas talks to GOOD about playing with food, being a jelly entrepreneur, and a gigantic cake for Will & Kate's royal wedding.


No offense to GOOD, but if I could work anywhere else in the world, it would probably be at Sam Bompas and Harry Parr's south London jelly factory*. [*NOTE: Jelly is known as Jell-O in the U.S.]

Sam and Harry launched their own company, Bompas & Parr, in 2007, with an architectural jelly banquet that included a wobbly Millennium Bridge designed by Norman Foster and ended in a food fight, during which someone hurled a jelly St. Paul's Cathedral out of the window.

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