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American Students Are Paying More Than Ever For College (Again)

Over the past five years, the average published price at a four-year university has increased by 27 percent.


We've all heard the saying that the only guarantees in life are death and taxes. Well, here's another truism: Every year the cost of college goes up. Over the past five years, the average published price at a four-year university has increased by 27 percent. According to the College Board's annual Trends in College Pricing report, costs at these "institutions rose more rapidly between 2002-03 and 2012-13 than over either of the two preceding decades."

It's not that schools are trying to gouge students. Instead, the report notes that revenue shortages—think of all the reports you hear of state budget cuts to higher education—instead of wild spending on campus are behind the rapid rise in public college prices. And yes, prices are up again for the 2012-2013 school year, too. The average published tuition and fees for in-state students attending four-year public colleges and universities jumped 4.8 percent—increasing an average of $399 dollars to $8,655 in 2012‐2012, and the costs of room and board rose 3.7 percent—up $399 dollars to $9,205. Combined with the cost of books, supplies, and other expenses the sticker price to attend an in-state public college is up 3.8 percent to a new record $22,261.

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Forget the venerated U.S. News & World Report college rankings. The list that cash-strapped prospective students and their parents will really be paying attention to this fall comes from the government. On Thursday the U.S. Department of Education unveiled the College Affordability and Transparency Center, a new website designed to provide clear data about the true cost of college.

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How to Protest The Cost of College Tuition: Pay With Dollar Bills

It took Nic Ramos two days to collect enough singles from "five or six" different bank branches. But he made his point.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-o3Agc9KCI

Want to send a message that you're fed up with the rising cost of college? Do what University of Colorado at Boulder sophomore Nic Ramos did. Pay your tuition in cash. With dollar bills.

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