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You Can Now Win a Historic New England Inn with Your Snappy Writing

All it takes is a 200-word essay and a whole lot of entrepreneurial spirit.

A view from inside the Center Lovell Inn, courtesy of the inn.

If you were a Lit, Creative Writing, or Liberal Arts major I’m sure you’re pretty sick of people telling you how “useless” your degree is. So why not silence all those haters by using your pithy prose to win your very own historic New England inn? Janice Sage, current owner of the Center Lovell Inn and Restaurant in Lovell, Maine, first won the deed through an essay writing competition in 1993. Now, at the age of 68, Sage would like to retire—and is paying the gift forward via a new contest. The deadline is May 7, and Sage anticipates receiving upwards of 7,500 entries. During her 22 years as the manager of Center Lovell Inn, Sage invested $500,000 in renovations, and often worked more than 17 hour days, but is now ready to take some much-needed time off: 'I've been in the business 38 years so it's time to retire.” Sage, who had also run another Inn prior to Center Lovell, told the Daily Mail this week, “I just want to pass it on to somebody else who is looking for an inn, who possibly can't own it on their own outright and I think this is a good way.” The inn is a breezy three hours north of Boston, and is popular with tourists year round. Sage currently employs 10 staffers to cook, clean, serve at the restaurant, take reservations, and handle guest check out. It has not been mentioned yet whether the new owner will also be inheriting these seasoned staffers.

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New Detroit Program Trades Houses for Literary Excellence

Write a House names Brooklyn poet Casey Rocheteau as first recipient of free home in Detroit

There are cities that inspire great works of literature: Paris, Dublin, St. Petersburg. Their beauty, rawness, and crushing surrealism bleed into certain narratives and each city becomes more than a setting—it becomes the beating heart of some of our greatest literature. We know these cities, many of us, because we first entered into them through a book.

Now picture Detroit. Those who have never been to Detroit will have had their perceptions shaped by headlines—the crippling poverty, the water shut-offs, the Silverdome sold for less than the cost of a house, the population plummeting from 1.86 million to 700,000. If you’re unfamiliar with the city, it’s easy to assume Detroit is a place of desperation.

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Food Studies: The Trouble with Land-Grant Universities

150 years ago, the government founded land-grant universities to keep agriculture alive in the U.S. What should they be teaching today?

Food Studies features the voices of volunteer student bloggers from a variety of different food- and agriculture-related programs at universities around the world. Don't miss Claire's first post, in which she explained how a fiction writer from Brooklyn ended up with her hands buried wrist deep in vermicompost at the University of Minnesota.

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