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The GGG Cocktail: A Non-Vanilla Drink Inspired by Dan Savage The G-G-G Cocktail for Dan Savage

Tired of swallowing anti-gay rhetoric? Drink a GGG instead, a cocktail dedicated to sex columnist and LGBT advocate Dan Savage.


It’s Wednesday—time for GOOD’s cocktailian-in-residence to offer liquid solace to a needy public figure. This week: re-controversial sex columnist Dan Savage.

It’s no surprise that the right-wing attack machine occasionally takes a break from trumping up reasons to hate President Obama (this week: POTUS hated the Beastie Boys! Because of racism!) to remember that Dan Savage exists, and that he tends to say things conservatives don’t like.

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When Digital Shaming Goes too Far: Lessons From the Seattle Tip Stiffer

A mean comment made this week in Seattle sparked a digital lynch mob. What can we learn from the Andrew Meyer dustup?


When I was 18, I got drunk at a party and ended up in a minor argument with a female friend of a friend. I don’t remember what started the bickering—Marx? Beer pong? What do college freshmen fight about?—but I do remember what ended it. I turned to the girl, who was midsentence, and snarled, "Why don’t you just go away and kill yourself?" My words weren’t witty or clever, but they weren’t meant to be. They were meant to be mean and vicious, and ultimately they produced my desired effect: The girl ran away in tears, leaving me and my friends alone to laugh about it.

A decade later, I’m still really embarrassed about what I said that night. The girl I’d hurt and humiliated forgave me a few weeks later, but to this day, when I see her or think about her I feel a little internal wince, as if my conscience is still flogging me. Blessedly, however, the mistake I made at that party occurred 10 years ago, meaning I was able to avoid the most terrifying critic yet devised by man: the internet. This week, Andrew Meyer wasn’t so lucky.

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The History of the Word Bully Bully: A Vicious, Cowardly Word With a Long History

What the history of the word can tell us about the (unfortunately) hot topic of bullying.

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What the history of the word can tell us about the (unfortunately) hot topic of bullying.

As kids, most of us were probably on both sides of bullying. That was the case with me. As an unconfident, skinny dork, I was a tempting target for certain jackasses—but I wasn’t above contributing to class-wide bullying of the most put-upon social pariahs. It didn’t take much guts or brains to intimidate me, and it took even less balls of my own to dish out mean words to kids who were already taking it from nearly everyone. I guess it evened out.

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