GOOD

Why Oysters are Shacking up in Old Subway Cars

States scrap over metal in a race to boast the greenest reef.

In 2001, New York City had over 1,000 outdated subway cars on its hands. When they were first introduced in 1959, the old Redbird trains were gorgeous machines, but after four decades of service, it was time for the battered cars to be permanently retired. But rather than take them to a slag heap to be salvaged for scrap or crushed into little metal cubes, the city took 619 of the cars, stripped them of their windows and oily undercarriages, steam cleaned them, and then hauled the 20,000 pound metal boxes down to Delaware on a freighter ship. Then they dumped them all into the sea.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Do State Legislators Need a College Degree?

Almost 25 percent of state legislators don't have a bachelor's degree. Does America need lawmakers with more schooling?

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Video: These Sixth Grade Girls Might Fix the Next Oil Spill

An all-girls school takes on robotics, and they're starting out building robots based on the model that capped the Deepwater Horizon oil well.

\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n Remember last summer's BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico? Remember the drama over whether remotely operated robots would be able to cap the well? Thank goodness some smart techies designed those robots, or we'd probably still be watching that horrible live feed of gushing oil. And, thank goodness a Delaware teacher by the name of Mitchell Greenberg is training the next generation of smart techies who know how to design and run oil-spill-stopping robots. Check out the 14 impressive sixth-grade girls in the clip above.

The girls are students at Reach Academy, a single-gender school outside of Wilmington. Thanks to a grant, Greenberg's teaching them how to build seven underwater SeaPerch robots that are, according to Delaware Online, "modeled after the robot that helped cap the oil spill." Greenberg says the girls are learning about electronics, circuitry boards, math, and engineering, and, once the robots are complete, they'll be entered into a national robotics competition at Drexel University. Watch the girls in action as they explain what they're learning and drill holes in the robot bodies so they'll sink in water.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles