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The Waterless City

Marveling at our massive systems of aqueducts—can L.A. ever get water from local sources?

Every three months, GOOD releases our quarterly magazine, which examines a given theme through our unique lens. Recent editions have covered topics like the impending global water crisis, the future of transportation, and the amazing rebuilding of New Orleans. This quarter's issue is about cities, spotlighting Los Angeles, and we'll be rolling out a variety of stories all month. You can subscribe to GOOD here.

Los Angeles has no business being a major city. That is to say, through the plain, unforgiving lens of physical geography, there simply isn’t enough water to quench the collective thirst of the roughly 10 million residents of Los Angeles County. If it weren’t for a handful of visionaries who imagined, planned, and built the L.A. Aqueduct—one of mankind’s most incredible civic work projects to date when it was built back in 1913—the Los Angeles we know and love today would never have been.

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Why Californians Will Soon Be Drinking Water from Mexico's Ocean

The desalination of seawater is becoming an inevitability. Californians will soon be drinking Mexico's ocean water.

Yesterday, the Department of the Interior released a pretty scary report about the impacts of climate change on water in the Southwest. The report (PDF), which "represents the first consistent and coordinated assessment of risks to future water supplies across eight major Reclamation river basins," paints a frightening picture of an already arid region that undergoing a long, painful desertification.

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