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Your House is Full of Emotions Says Study on Room-Specific Feelings

Is the living room sad? The kitchen anxious? One new study seeks to determine how a room really feels.

A handy breakdown on how each room "feels," according to University of Texas, Austin.

Do you ever walk into someone’s house and get, well, just kind of depressed? Some might call it bad Feng Shui, but a new survey of “domestic ambiances” says that certain rooms really do have the ability to make us feel very specific, very tangible emotions. Led by a group of psychologists at U of T Austin, 200 people were given a list of 18 hypothetical rooms that typically exist within an “ideal” home, and asked them to pick two “ambiance descriptions” of each space. According to City Lab, one of the exact questions was, “as you enter each of the following spaces, what are the most important emotions or perceptions you would like to evoke within yourself and others?” The psychologists supplied 29 pre-selected words, which were available to choose from for those without linguistic creativity.

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Kinkajou Projector Brings Literacy to Mali

Teaching adults to read is a difficult enough task in and of itself, but in rural Mali, teachers also face classrooms without electricity and books weathered by the punishing desert climate. Enter the Kinkajou Projector, a fusion of high and low technology that makes teaching night literacy classes as..

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5B_RK61NI1QTeaching adults to read is a difficult enough task in and of itself, but in rural Mali, teachers also face classrooms without electricity and books weathered by the punishing desert climate. Enter the Kinkajou Projector, a fusion of high and low technology that makes teaching night literacy classes as easy as ABC.LEARN MOREDesign That Matters

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