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The Day the Wall Came Down: One Gay Soldier on the End of Don't Ask, Don't Tell

We are now armed with our most powerful weapon yet: a voice.

The following are my own personal thoughts and beliefs; I am not speaking on behalf of the Department of Defense or the United States Army.

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Intermission: One Soldier's Personal DADT Repeal Celebration

To mark the repeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell, one soldier stationed abroad filmed himself calling his father to tell him he's gay.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVAgz6iyK6A&feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL

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Growing Up in a World Without an Anti-War Movement

College military recruitment is up. The recession is to blame, but so is the lack of a palpable anti-war movement.

In 1990, television reporters came into my first grade classroom and asked me what I thought about the Gulf War. I had an automatic answer that echoed my parents’ protest generation: “War is bad. People get killed. Stop the war.” Then I told the reporter about the letter campaign we had started in my class. We were asking the first Bush to send the troops home.

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"Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Repealed: What's Next?

After the Senate's historic vote on Saturday, how soon will the repeal go into effect?

On Saturday, the Senate finally voted to repeal "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" by a majority of 65 to 31 (you can check out how your Senator voted here). So what's next?

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Might Gays Be Better Soldiers?

Differences in homosexual brains suggest that gay soldiers might make for a sharper fighting force.


With the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” looking imminent, the next question on America’s mind is what a military with openly gay soldiers will look like. Most experts, including Defense Secretary Robert Gates and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Admiral Mike Mullen, believe that a repeal of the discriminatory law won’t at all endanger the military’s stability. And a large majority of enlisted troops agree with them. But what if a military that welcomes gays and lesbians with open arms doesn’t just not fall part, but actually shows remarkable improvement?

For decades now, scientists seeking to understand why people are gay have done neurological research on homosexual versus heterosexual brain patterns. Though these experiments might initially sound like phrenology, pseudoscientific hooey that attempted to predict mental ability based on the size and shape of the skull, in fact, they have been academic and replicable. And while there’s still no consensus as to what makes someone gay, the differences between gay and straight brains that these studies have uncovered are not insignificant.

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Bono vs. Lady Gaga: Who Is More Influential Online?

When it comes to influence online, popularity and reach are not the same thing. So who gets the crown? And how does it apply to you?



When it comes to social networking and the internet, popularity is, apparently, not the same thing as influence. A new study by social-media maven Brian Solis and researchers at Vocus has pitted meat-dress-wearing Lady Gaga, who has 6.5 million Twitter followers and counting, against U2's Bono, one of the most recognizable men in the world by face and voice, and a big-time philantropist and activist. The goal? To figure out what makes an online influencer (slash, to figure out who is more influential between these two pop stars).

It's an interesting study relevant to all of us with an online life, obviously—not just to famous people. Among the key findings:

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