GOOD

The First Doughnut in Space is a Beautiful Thing

These Swedish brothers are space pastry pioneers.

Screenshot from YouTube user Stratolys

The first doughnut in space, a classic pink-sprinkled Homer Simpson special, soared majestically above this swiftly tilting blue orb we call Earth; lonely, silent, and brave, the pioneering pastry danced in the aether before crashing down to the terrestrial waters from which all life, and by extension all baked goods, spring. Like Icarus, the brash snack food reached its glory in defiance of the laws of god and man—doughnuts were never meant to fly, or so we are all told. But this particular doughnut had a destiny to fulfill, and aided by its one little friend, a GoPro camera, and a pair of helpful Swedish brothers, it ascended into both our hearts and the annals of history.

Keep Reading
Articles

Chicago School Bans Brown Bag Lunches, But Is It for the Kids?

Students at Little Village Academy can't eat anything except the food served in the cafeteria.


Millions of American kids take sack lunches to school every day, either because they don't like the school food or because their parents aren't psyched about the nutritional quality—think tater tots and greasy chicken pattiesoffered on campus. Now in an interesting twist on the lunch debate, a growing number of schools say that their efforts to make mealtime healthier are undermined by parents who pack junk food in their children's lunches.

Six years ago, Little Village Academy, a 100 percent Hispanic pre-K through eighth grade public school on Chicago's West Side, put a stop to junk food coming from home when they banned their 780 students from bringing any lunch, period. Students can't eat anything except the lunch the school provides.

Keep Reading
Articles