GOOD

Why Dr. Bronner's is on a Soapbox for GMO Labeling

Why Dr. Bronner's is on a Soapbox for GMO Labeling

[youtube]http://youtu.be/nm95vooWxx0

On November 5, citizens in Washington State will vote on whether to require mandatory labeling of genetically engineered foods, also known as genetically modified organisms or GMOs. Win or lose, The Washington Right to Know Genetically Engineered Food Act is driving the national push on GMO labeling in states around the country as well as at the federal level—just as the narrowly defeated Prop 37 in California did last year.

Keep Reading
Articles

What's In Your Soap? More Than You Know

How deep do you want to delve into your soap's ingredients list?


Organically-inclined shoppers know Dr. Bronner's Magic Soaps by its simple, transparent packaging that reads like a blueprint for its cleaning product. Dr. Bronner's rose liquid soap, for example, lists just nine ingredients in a prominent space on the front of the label, right above the soap's intended use, dangers, and recycling status. If the Safe Cosmetics Act of 2011 is successful, the ingredients disclosure would take up even more real estate on Dr. Bronner's packaging: The rose soap's ingredients list would inflate from nine to 22.

Under the proposed legislative overhaul of cosmetics producers, every soap, lotion, or powder sold in the U.S. would be forced to disclose the components in its components—including the complex formulas that make up "natural fragrances." What Dr. Bronner's now calls simply “Natural Rose Fragrance” technically consists of 14 separate ingredients—Grapefruit Oil, Orange Oil, Glycerin, Geranium Oil, Davana Oil, Rosa Damanscena (Rose Distillate), Rosemary Oil, Eucalyptus Oil, Juniper Berries Oil, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Ethanol, Ionone, Ethyl Butyrate, and Phenylacetic Acid—all of which would get a nod were the retooled ingredients rules to go into effect.

Keep Reading
Articles

Beauty Contest: Cosmetics Companies Split Over Safety Act Safe Cosmetics Act Splits Makeup Companies

American consumers have never more access to stuff to put on our bodies. But the laws controlling cosmetics haven't budged since 1938.



American consumers have never had access to so many products to clean, primp, paint, powder, dye, straighten, and smooth our bodies. But the laws controlling those cosmetics haven't budged since 1938. The Safe Cosmetics Act of 2011 would give the rules a modern boost, banning ingredients linked to cancer or birth defects, mandating better ingredients disclosures, and increasing FDA oversight over the industry.

To U.S. cosmetics companies big and small, the terms of the act aren't necessarily pretty. When the first draft of the bill hit last year, the cosmetics industry took on legislators over its language, which they say could spawn confusing ingredients lists, place administrative chokeholds on small businesses, and rely on science they don't trust. The bill has since been amended to address some of those concerns. And now, a small group of cosmetics companies have found a way to separate themselves from the pack: Promote the act, and their own products, too.

Keep Reading
Articles