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Mark Zuckerberg Invests In Undocumented College Students’ Futures

Over 65,000 undocumented students in America aren’t eligible for financial aid. The Facebook founder wants to change that.

Image via Flickr user Edward Kimmel

If you’re one of 65,000 undocumented high school graduates here in America, going to college can often feel impossibly hard. While some funding is occasionally available by the state, most undocumented students aren’t eligible for the federal grants, loans, or work-studies needed to graduate college. That’s why Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, recently decided that they would donate $5 million to help fund college scholarships for undocumented students in the San Francisco Bay area.

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Why It's Up to Us to Change the Future For Undocumented Youth

Together let's create a path to citizenship for undocumented individuals, students, and their families.


Imagine you are a young man of color holding a can of red spray paint because you are touching up some of your artwork. A law enforcement vehicle drives up toward you. Two officers step out, ask you to stop what you're doing, and instruct you to provide them with a copy of your driver's license. You don't have one because even though you've spent years in this country, attending schools where each morning you pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, technically, you're undocumented—an American in every way except for on paper, and unfortunately it's only the paper that counts.

This happens in front of your home so your barefoot mother runs out. Despite her corroboration of your name and age—and her willingness to produce an ID bearing her name, age, and address—the officers put you in the back of the patrol car. They insist your profile matches that of a suspect they've been looking for, but after searching your person, the contents of your cell phone, and everything else they see fit to examine, they are unable to find any evidence. But you're still in the back of the police car. They won't let you go.

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Dreaming Wide Awake: The Powerful Youth Voice, the DREAM Act, and Election 2012

On June 15, 2012, after years of congressional and executive inaction, the Obama Administration announced that undocumented immigrants under the...


On June 15, 2012, after years of congressional and executive inaction, the Obama Administration announced that undocumented immigrants under the age of 30, who came to the United States before the age of 16, pose no criminal or security threat, and have been successful students or served in the military, would be eligible for a two-year deferral from deportation and be able to apply for work permits.

This directive gives approximately 1.7 million young, undocumented immigrants (frequently called Dreamers) the chance of applying for temporary two-year deportation relief and work permits. The inspiration for Obama’s deferred action directive came from the DREAM (acronym for Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors) Act, bipartisan legislation, initially introduced to Congress in 2001 to benefit undocumented minors.

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Student Protesters Attack Prince Charles and Camilla

As the U.S. Senate spent yesterday striking down progressive legislation, the U.K. Parliament also tacked conservative. Students in Britain revolted.

Amidst chants of "Tory scum!" and "Off with their heads!" Prince Charles and his wife, Camilla, found their Rolls-Royce smack in the middle of a student protest over Britain's rising price of college tuition. About 50 protesters swarmed their vehicle, smashing a window and dousing it in a coat of white paint.

While the U.S. Senate spent yesterday striking down progressive legislation (tabling the DREAM Act, blocking aid for 9/11 first responders, and failing to repeal "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"), the U.K. Parliament similarly tacked conservative, by voting to increase annual college tuition to approximately $14,000 a year, while simultaneously cutting government funding by an additional 80 percent. (The catch being that loans only have to be paid back if graduates go on to earn a salary of more than $34,000.)

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DREAM Act Delayed After House Passage. Will Senate Reciprocate?

The Senate just voted to table debate on the DREAM Act until early next week. Will it get the 60 votes needed for passage?

The DREAM Act's fate is delayed yet again.

While the bill was expected to be voted upon by the Senate earlier this morning, legislators just voted to table discussion until next early week, with supporters fearing that Democratic leadership will fall short of the 60 votes needed for passage.

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