GOOD

Is This “Self-Destructing” Book The Future Of Reading?

Author James Patterson’s new thriller might be a sign of e-books to come.

image via youtube screen capture

I’ve never read anything by James Patterson, author of the massively popular Alex Cross series, as well as numerous other bestselling thrillers and mystery stories. But, after hearing how his latest book is being promoted, I’ll admit, I’m intrigued. For Patterson’s upcoming Private Vegas, marketing company Mother New York rolled out a campaign that is charmingly novel in the immediate, and has the possibility to be much more impactful in the long term.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Death of Traditional Books? Kids Prefer Reading Via Screen

For the first time in history, more kids are reading digitally than they are reading print texts. Is this a good thing?


You've probably seen those doom and gloom headlines along the vein of "The Death of Print Books Is Nigh." Indeed, the Borders nearest to my house, which surely killed a couple mom and pop bookstores, is now a massive Walgreens. Barnes and Noble keeps Legos and educational games in stock, but if I want to pick up the five-novel box set of Lloyd Alexander's Chronicles of Prydain for my 9-year-old, it's not on the shelves. "You should order that online," the associate told me. Still, it's not too tough to shrug off those death of print stories because traditional books are the norm for me and I'm always buying them.

That's most decidedly not the case for kids born in the digital age. A recent survey of nearly 35,000 eight to 16-year-olds by the U.K.'s National Literacy Trust found that for the first time, more kids are reading via electronic devices than traditional books. A full 52 percent preferred reading books on a tablet or other electronic device, while in comparison, only 32 percent preferred traditional books. The remaining 16 percent had no preference or said they don't like to read.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Bookless Libraries: America's First is Coming to Texas

Bexar County, Texas plans to open BiblioTech, a completely book-free literacy experience.


Over the past couple of years bookless libraries have popped up on both K-12 and college campuses. But, other than making digital versions of the latest Hunger Games novel available for borrowing with your e-reader, public libraries are still bastions of traditional hardback and softcover texts. Well, Bexar County, Texas is taking the plunge and embracing the electronic era. This fall they plan to open BiblioTech, the first fully digital public library in America.

Judge Nelson Wolff, the driving force behind the digital library, told the San Antonio Express News that although he is a book lover with over a 1,000 first editions in his personal collection, the future is a fully digital experience. If you're wondering what the library will look like, well, Wolff got inspired while reading Steve Jobs' biography so look no further than your local Apple store.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

At this past weekend's Techonomy Conference 2010 in Lake Tahoe, One Laptop per Child Founder Nicholas Negroponte answered a fundamental question that OLPC critics have fired his way over the years: You can't just hand a kid in a developing world country a laptop and continue on your way, can you?

According to the program's experience in Peru, Negroponte says, "you actually can" do just that. The kids apparently cotton to the new technology pretty easily, and can even use it to teach themselves how to read and write. But, that's not all, he explains: "50 percent of the kids in Peru who use this laptop are teaching their parents how to read and write."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles