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Educating the Next Generation of Nonprofit Leaders

Atlas Corps shows that it's not just "the West" that can help "the developing world," but that doctors from Sudan can improve U.S. women's health too.


On a recent Friday morning in Washington D.C., representatives from Armenia, Colombia, Egypt, Ghana, Mexico, South Korea, and Zimbabwe gathered around a conference table. The start of another World Bank meeting? Better: It's a bimonthly "Training Day"—a gathering of professionals from around the world who've joined Atlas Corps and committed to a year of professional service in the United States or Latin America. On that particular Friday, the topic was how to effectively utilize social media to create a public advocacy campaign. (You can imagine the three participants from Egypt had a few thoughts on the topic!)

These Fellows, as they're officially known, have put their lives on hold in their home countries to gain a year of professional experience at organizations like Acumen, Ashoka, Grameen Foundation, Susan G. Komen, and even the U.S. Peace Corps. They're part of a network of 140 professionals from 40 countries. For the Fellows, it means exposure on a global stage. To the organizations, it means first-hand international knowledge. In addition, the long-term—12 to 18 months—term of service allows for deep learning and significant impact.

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How a National Alliance of Community Colleges Could Move the Country Forward

Rebuilding America's Middle Class plans to advocate for workforce development, innovation, and affordability at community colleges.


With an increasing number of recent high school graduates—and more experienced workers seeking to brush up on their skills—looking for affordable education options, community colleges have become a key to educating the workforce of the future. But despite increased demand—13 million students a year attend community college, up 9 percent since 2006—the recession has slashed community college budgets. Now, those schools are banding together to form Rebuilding America’s Middle Class, a nonprofit national coalition that plans to advocate for increased support for community colleges.

Students' ability to earn an affordable professional certificate or degree through a community college education is a critical part of building America's middle class. The average student can earn a professional certificate in a year for as little as $1,500, a crucial factor for the large number of low-income students of color who attend community colleges. Staying in school to earn an associate's degree or enough credits to transfer to a four-year school costs the average student between $7,000 and $8,000—less than half the cost for the same classes at most public four-year colleges. And those certificates and college credits qualify students for higher paying jobs.

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Why We Must Fund the Knowledge Economy

Funding higher education is an essential investment in our economy and our democracy


In his 2012 State of the Union address, President Obama said "higher education can't be a luxury—it's an economic imperative that every family in America should be able to afford." But the hard truth is that it's not. And it won't be until we make some changes and view higher education as an investment in everyone's future.

According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, over the past 30 years America has slipped from first to 21st in high school completion rates and 15th in college completion rates compared to other nations. Today's students are facing obstacles that make earning a college degree a much harder journey than it was just a few years ago.

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