GOOD

The Five Best Projects from the Gates Foundation's Education Technology Competition

Here are our five favorite projects from the Gates Foundation's education technology grant competition.

On Tuesday the Gates Foundation announced 19 winners of the second phase of its Next Generation Learning Challenges grant competition. The NGLC's priority is using technology to improve college readiness among low-income students, and what makes these new grantees noteworthy is that they're working on targeting the critical seventh- through ninth-grade years—well before students can either drop out or fall too far behind in higher level math and science. Each project is also aligned with the new Common Core Standards, which are all about developing higher-order thinking skills. While all 19 grantees are noteworthy, here are five that really stand out:

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

“The Modern Educator Is Not a Teacher”: Updating Learning for the 21st Century

Classrooms operate almost the same way they did 100 years ago. A group of of middle schoolers from the Dallas-Fort Worth area want to change that.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGvl5dg3l2M

Why do classrooms and schools operate almost the same way they did 100 years ago? A group of middle schoolers from the Dallas-Fort Worth area began asking themselves this question during a class discussion of Orson Scott Card's science fiction novel Ender's Game. More importantly, they began to wonder, "Could children, using the internet, have a dramatic impact on the world around them? Could they influence public opinion, and make a mark on their world?" Thus began "Education Evolution," a class video project that brings a student perspective to what's going wrong in the modern classroom, and offers up ideas of how it can be fixed.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Eighth Grader's 9/11 Documentary Set to Screen at Tribeca Film Festival

"The Second Day" tells the first-hand story of students and teachers living and working in the area around Ground Zero.

Ten years ago, 14-year-old New York City eighth grader Brook Peters was just another kindergartener living in Tribeca. But then the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 happened, forever changing his life, and the lives of over 5,600 other students in lower Manhattan. Now the teen's documentary, aptly named "The Second Day" because 9/11 was his second day of kindergarten at P.S. 150, will screen on Saturday at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles