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Is Education About to Go Local?

The Republicans' obsession with local control could undermine efforts to fix No Child Left Behind.


Come January, the chair of the House's Education and Labor Committee will be Minnesota Republican John Kline. He's not a big fan of the federal government having too much say in how state and city school systems do their business. One of his favorite phrases is "local control."

And his disdain for programs like Race to the Top and the Common Core State Standards could end up being a roadblock in any attempt to reauthorize ESEA (the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, currently known as No Child Left Behind). He did, however, tell the AP that he thinks that the ESEA is an area where Democrats and Republicans can "make changes." After all, both sides of the aisle agree that the Act, in its current form, is largely ineffective.

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Can Education Reform Survive Election Day?

What is at stake for education reform in this election? Read on.


Headed to the polls to vote? That means you'll be deciding who will implement—or possibly not implement—much-needed education reforms. As we've seen in Washington, D.C., with Mayor Adrian Fenty's lost bid for mayoral re-election, and the subsequent resignation of D.C. schools chancellor Michelle Rhee, who's in office makes a difference for schools.

The next Congress faces the charge of reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, also known as No Child Left Behind (NCLB). However, whether that reauthorization will happen seamlessly given that candidates, like Kentucky's Rand Paul, want to completely shutter the federal Department of Education, remains to be seen.

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Why Republicans Should Embrace Obama's Education Agenda

The old GOP playbook on education won't work today, say two conservative education experts.

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