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South Korea's Making the Switch to Digital Textbooks

No more heavy backpacks. South Korea is investing $2 billion to develop digital textbooks for all schools by 2015.

When it comes to digital textbook adoption, it looks like Florida's turning into a global trendsetter. This spring the state passed a law mandating that schools make the switch to digital textbooks by 2015. Now South Korea's Education Ministry has announced that it's making a $2.4 billion investment that will enable all of that nation's schools to go digital by 2015.

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A Goverment Shutdown Will Seriously Screw Students with Loans

Low-income college students might just not be getting those checks that keep them afloat if the government shuts down.


With the midnight deadline to reach a budget deal looming, we're getting closer to the federal government shutdown. The U.S. Department of Education has announced it will have to furlough 93 percent of its staff, about 4,500 workers, but what's the actual impact on the students of America?

Unfortunately, the DOE grinding to a halt could negatively affect cash-strapped college students, particularly those receiving financial aid through work-study jobs and Perkins Loans. Over 590,000 students at 3,400 colleges and universities have work-study jobs to help pay the bills. The government funnels $951 million per year to colleges, which then use the funds to cut work study checks to students. A shutdown will probably stop those much needed paychecks. Also affected are the 673,000 students at 1,600 schools who have Perkins Loans. During the shutdown period, no new loans will be able to be disbursed to students.

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Do Elementary Students Know What a Record Is?

Watch elementary school kids in Montreal, Canada try to make sense of ancient technology from the 1980s and 1990s. We've come a long way.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdSHeKfZG7c

In a video (in French; see it with English subtitles here) that is sure to simultaneously make you feel both really old and really amazed by how rapidly technology has changed in the past 30 years, elementary school kids in Montreal, Canada are exposed to some late 20th century tech gadgets. Cyberpresse researcher Jean-Christophe Laurence shows the students"old school" objects—like floppy disks, a Nintendo Game Boy, and a Fisher Price 45 rpm record player—and asks them to guess what they're for.

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