GOOD

The CIA’s Declassified UFO Files Are Now Available Online

The storied Project Blue Book case files are teeming with UFOs.

The CIA's legendary Project Blue Book is now fully declassified and available to read online. An official investigation by the CIA into the existence of UFOs, aliens and all the other eerie stuff that The X-Files is made of, Project Blue Book, also known as Project Sign and Project Grudge, existed from the late 1940s through 1967. Read all of its 140,000 pages and more than 10,000 case files on UFO enthusiast John Greenewald's website The Black Vault.

Some choice excerpts and images:

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Twitter Commemorates Roe v. Wade With #7in10forRoe

On the 42nd anniversary of the decision making abortion legal in the U.S., a social media push shows support for reproductive rights.

On the 42nd anniversary of Roe v. Wade, House Republicans pushed legislation through that would permanently ban the use of taxpayer funding for abortions. While their initial plans to vote on a bill that would have effectively prohibited abortions after the 20 week mark were scrapped in light of women in the party arguing that the bill did nothing to consider victims of rape, this smaller measure is just as disheartening for pro-choice supporters everywhere. NARAL Pro-choice America took to Twitter to ask its followers why they stand with the 70 percent of Americans who support Roe v. Wade, using the hashtag #7in10forRoe. Here are some choice tweets:

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

The White House Is Backing the Bioeconomy—But What Is It, Exactly?

The bioeconomy promises to lengthen our lives, address environmental issues, and clean up manufacturing.


In theory, the bioeconomy sounds amazing. The White House’s Office of Science and Technology, which released a blueprint boosting the idea yesterday, says the bioeconomy can help us “live long and healthier lives.” It can address environmental issues, increase agricultural productivity, and free manufacturing processes from their dirty history. It can create jobs.

But what is it?

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Federal Workers Are More Likely to Die Than Lose Their Jobs (and for Good Reason)

USA Today bemoans the fact that you're more likely to die than get fired from a federal job. An economist says this makes perfect sense.


A new USA Today report finds that if you work for the government, you're more likely to leave your job because of death from natural causes than you are to get fired. Same goes for layoffs, even in the recession. Private companies fire or lay people off at a rate of 3 percent annually; the government fired only 0.55 percent of its workers last budget year.

Besides getting some generic comments from federal representatives on how they try to "hire the right people," USA Today quotes one San Francisco State University management professor saying this is a bad, bad thing. The low departure rates show a failure to release poor performers and those with obsolete skills, he says. He adds that these statistics "would indicate a serious management problem."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Where Schools Really Get Their Money From, and Why It Needs to Change

Schools get the vast majority of their money from states. Federal funding just isn't a big factor right now. But the thing is, it should be.

Last week we compared the United States' spending on defense to spending on education and discovered that—surprise!—the federal education budget is a tiny fraction of the military budget. A commenter on that post pointed out, however, that education funding primarily comes from the states, not the federal government. That's true. The national debate about education funding is often focused on federal money, but it only makes up a small slice of any school's budget.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles