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Hey Girl, Feminist Mad Max Makes a Great Post-Apocalyptic Meme

Max is just mad about positive female role models and gender equality.

image via feminist mad max

While the now ubiquitous “hey girl” memes may have started with Ryan Gosling, it’s “Mad” Max Rockatansky who’s bringing the internet’s favorite feminist image macro into the future—the far future, in which the world has been ravaged by atomic war and ecological disaster.

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There Aren’t Enough Female Screenwriters in Hollywood, and Meryl Streep Is Doing Something to Fix That.

Meryl’s “The Writer’s Lab” will bring together eight promising female screenwriters for a weekend retreat with the Oscar winner herself.

image via (cc) flickr user mostribus84

Between 2010 and 2012, the number of movies written by women represented an abysmally low 9 percent of the total scripts sold in Hollywood for those years. It’s a disheartening figure, but one that should come (unfortunately) as little surprise in a field with a well-earned reputation for lopsided gender imbalance. That so few women’s voices are represented in Hollywood is not only troubling for viewers eager to see new and different perspectives in cinematic storytelling, but also poses a long-term problem for an industry which thrives—if not survives—on creativity and fresh voices (present crop of cinematic reboots, sequels, and “shared universes” notwithstanding).

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Feminist Heroes to Teach Kids Their ABCs in Badass New Picturebook

From Sonia Sotomayor to Patti Smith, “​Rad American Women A-Z”​ has all your favorite female icons in illustrated form.

A is for Angela Davis

Why just learn your ABCs when you can be empowered by them? A new illustrated children’s book from iconic City Lights press, “ Rad American Women A-Z,” offers kids the chance to educate themselves on women’s history and the alphabet at the same time. Written by Kate Schatz and illustrated by Miriam Klein Stahl, the book was inspired by Schatz’s 2-year-old daughter. As the writer told Mic, the book was created to fill the “feminist-shaped hole in children's literature” and goes from A (for Angela Davis) to Z (Zora Neale Hurston).

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