GOOD

This Standardized Testing Story Will Break Your Heart

This story of a student who sits till 6:30 p.m. trying to do her best on the state test is Exhibit A of what's wrong with high-stakes exams.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JyljNAqAZ40

Lately, much of the national education conversation has focused on the impact standardized tests have on adults—how the scores are used to determine school effectiveness, and whether they should be included in teacher evaluations. But, kids are the ones who actually have to take the tests, and no matter how much preparation they've had, they feel the stress of these high-stakes exams. Sometime kids do great on the tests anyway. But sometimes, they don't. Stories of students who don't—like this one told in the video above by Bob, a school employee from Texas—are pretty heartbreaking.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Mock Slave Auctions: How Not to Teach Kids About America's History

When it come to educating kids about slavery, teachers should think twice about the appropriateness of their hands on learning activities.


When it comes to educating kids about the Civil War and slavery, teachers might want to think twice about the appropriateness of their experiential learning activities. According to the Washington Post, Jessica Boyle, a fourth grade teacher at Sewells Point Elementary School in Norfolk chose to teach a lesson on the Civil War by turning her classroom into a slave auction. Boyle segregated her students—black and mixed race students on one side of the room, and white students on the other. The teacher then had the white students, all around ten years old, play the role of slave master and take turns purchasing their black and biracial peers.

The incident came to light after parents, understandably, complained. The school's principal, Mary B. Wrushen, sent a letter home stating that although Boyle's "actions were well intended to meet the instructional objectives, the activity presented was inappropriate for the students." Wrushen said the lesson was not supported by the school or district and acknowledged that it "could have been thought through more carefully, as to not offend her students or put them in an uncomfortable situation."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles