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Making Fish Farming Appetizing

Aqua-Spark wants to change an industry known for unclean practices

There’s a certain appeal to fish farming, also known as aquaculture. Growing aquatic life in offshore pens, rivers, or big, terrestrial tanks seems not only audacious, but as convenient as, well, shooting fish in a barrel. Already, aquaculture accounts for nearly 50 percent of the worldwide fish supply, and it’s growing faster than any other type of food production. Farm-raised seafood will soon jump to 62 percent of global fish served on a plate or bought in a supermarket by 2030, a 500 percent growth rate over 20 years, according to the USDA. At a time when 85 percent of marine life is overexploited and overfished, aquaculture seems like a viable alternative.

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Can This Fish Fillet Help Save Our Oceans?

Say goodbye to farm-raised salmon. There's a new fish in town that won't pollute the seas, for a change.

A good farmed fish is hard to find, but aquaculturists in western Massachusetts appear to have done the trick. Meet the barramundi, a South Pacific native, praised for its ability to thrive on a vegetarian diet, survive a low-oxygen environment, and churn out the holy grail of health-food compounds: omega-3 fatty acids.

Yesterday's article on The Atlantic's website christened barramundi as "the anti-salmon," a notoriously dirty fish when farm-raised. According to the article, Barramundi

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