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The Feminist Life: Malala Won’t Use the F-Word

A new column exploring women’s rights, promoting gender equality, and confronting sexism

On October 9, 2012, I had just returned to my New York City apartment in between classes at Columbia Business School when I saw the headlines: “Taliban Gun Down Girl Who Spoke Up for Rights.” Enraged and hopeless, I felt that the world had imploded and the promise of a better future—of equality between men and women everywhere—was dimmer than ever.

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An Ode to a 'Poor Black Kid' I Never Knew: How Forbes Gets Poverty Wrong

Forbes writer Gene Marks today tells us what he'd do if he were destitute and black. Here's what a poor minority kid I knew did.


One of the best parts about being an educator's son is getting to hear all the crazy things your parent has to deal with courtesy of the "bad kids." I was a relatively mild-mannered student, thanks in large part to the fact that my mother, a teacher turned school administrator, had raised me to be. Even when she wasn't verbally doling out conduct lessons, I saw how an interaction with a mean or violent student would leave her frazzled at the end of a long day, and I knew I never wanted to inflict the same kind of torment on anyone else's mom or dad. Nevertheless, a gut instinct of youthful rebellion underpinned by hip-hop and Propagandhi always led me to inquire about the wild kids at my mom's schools, the ones who didn't just listen to punk, but who acted it as well.

It was in pursuit of one of these vicarious thrills that I asked my mom why she was so upset one day when I was about 12 years old. "Just something from today with a student," she said. I pestered her for more details, and she told me the story. A kid at her school—a primarily low-income, high-minority middle school serving sixth- through eighth-graders—was acting out. His outbursts were not normal, especially considering how young he was: He was rude, aggressive, destructive, foulmouthed, so angry. I remember my mom saying she was amazed at how much rage could fit into such a tiny body.

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Which Rankings Can Actually Help You Pick a College?

The way we rank colleges is troubling: It's devoid of measures that are meaningful to students choosing a school. Anya Kamenetz ranks the rankers.

Antoine's Restaurant in New Orleans' French Quarter was founded in 1840. It is the oldest restaurant in the United States that has been continuously run by the same family.

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