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This Millionaire Baseball Player Lives in a Van

He finds luxury in minimalist living.

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A College Degree in Three Years? Why America Needs to Get on Board

Three-year degree programs save money and help students get on with their lives, but American students aren't signing up. They should be.

You'd think that given the spiraling cost of college, American students would jump at the chance to finish up school in three years instead of the typical four. With a three-year accelerated degree, parents have to fork over less cash for tuition and room and board, the family's loan burden is lighter, and students can get on with their career plans earlier. How does this not make sense? But despite the best efforts of both public and private universities to promote accelerated programs, students are sticking with the four-year college tradition. That's too bad because a three-year degree is a smart idea that we should be adopting.

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The Three Most Important Questions in Education

Educator and writer Sam Chaltain shares some revolutionary ideas about learning and freedom in his recent TedxSinCity talk.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6-VRO8G5LE

Educator, writer, and organizational change consultant Sam Chaltain is on a mission. He wants to shift conversations about education away from divisive discussions about unions and back to what should be the actual point of school: learning. For the last several years, he asked everyone from big names like Arne Duncan to everyday people (like you) about their most powerful education experiences, which he then compiled into his recent book Faces of Learning. While the narratives show that effective education is challenging, engaging, supportive, relevant, and experiential, they also put the spotlight on what we should be asking to get us closer to that ideal.

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For-profits and Open Education Make for Uneasy Bedfellows (Or Do They?)

Why Kaplan has the ability and the resources to be innovative in the realm of for-profit higher education. A case for first cleaning up their act.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e50YBu14j3U

Why Kaplan has the ability and the resources to be innovative in the realm of for-profit higher education. A case for first cleaning up their act.

I was in Barcelona earlier this month for the Mozilla Drumbeat Festival on the Future of Learning, Freedom and the Web. (I'll be producing an ebook documenting the festival.) It was overlapping with the OpenEd Conference, the premiere gathering for the global open educational resources community, featuring such edtech luminaries as David Wiley, Brian Lamb, and Scott Leslie, which I attended last year in Vancouver when I was researching DIY U.

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