GOOD

You Can Turn E.Coli Bacteria into Microscopic Fuel Factories

How a canister of germs in your garage could replace the gas station.

At some point in your life, Escherichia coli has probably brought you to your knees to pray to the porcelain god. Common bacteria that often live harmlessly in the guts of most animals, a few strains of it can cause anything from food poisoning to death in humans. But, according to news out of Washington University in St. Louis last month, it may also be the key in our quest to find a renewable, environmentally safe fuel source.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Chart: Even More Proof We Can't Drill Our Way to Lower Gas Prices

This chart totally debunks the GOP's false claim that the President's policies have anything to do with gas prices.

Yesterday, the office of House Speaker John Boehner posted this graph on their blog, saying that "gas prices have doubled since President Obama took office."

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Even Fossil Fuel-Friendly EIA Says Massive Expansion of Offshore Drilling Won't Lower Gas Prices

The cold, hard facts on why "Drill, baby, drill" is a canard, and why increasing our cars' fuel efficiency is a much better way to lower gas prices.

With the price of gas up at $3.86 per gallon, opportunistic politicians are again making the stubborn case that this administration's drilling policies are responsible for rising gas prices—or that Obama hasn't done enough to lower the price of gas. They are wrong.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

2009 List: People Movers

Seven factors that will change how we move around this year.\r\n1. The higher cost of driving  Gas taxes haven't been raised in 15 years, despite an inflation rate that has turned that 1993 dollar into 70 cents of buying power. Transportation construction costs have almost tripled in that same time period,..\r\n

Seven factors that will change how we move around this year.

1. The higher cost of driving Gas taxes haven't been raised in 15 years, despite an inflation rate that has turned that 1993 dollar into 70 cents of buying power. Transportation construction costs have almost tripled in that same time period, so expect to see every possible way of raising funds, like more tolling, higher tolls, and more talk about congestion pricing.2. Government spending on infrastructure The economy, unemployment, and the sorry state of our transportation infrastructure are aligning to get some big projects fast-tracked with money that doesn't come from gas-tax dollars. Will it be new highways, new transit, or bridges to nowhere? Politics will tell.3. Public transportation getting more popular 2007 saw a 50-year high in U.S. transit ridership numbers. The first quarter of 2008 beat that record by 3.3 percent. Ironically, transit agencies had little ability to expand capacity, as they had to absorb the rising fuel costs without raising the price of travel.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles