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Scientific Americans: A Program to Get 1,000 Real, Working Scientists in School Classrooms

The new 1,000 Scientists in 1,000 Days programs hopes to make connecting scientists with schools a lot simpler.

It's not easy for a teacher to randomly call up the biology department at the local college and ask, "Do you have someone who can come talk to my students about how viruses attack cells?" Likewise, scientists interested in working with students and helping support academic instruction in the classroom don't always know which schools really want their help. Thankfully, Scientific American is about to make connecting scientists and schools a whole lot easier thanks to their new 1,000 Scientists in 1,000 Days program. They're recruiting "scientists who are willing to volunteer to advise on curricula, answer a classroom's questions, or visit a school—for instance, to do a lab or to talk about what you do."

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Getting Under My Skin: When "Tiger Mother" Meets "Race to Nowhere"

Frustrated kids and conflicting messages about education are leaving parents more confused than ever about how to handle our "achievement culture".


My 15-year-old daughter stopped talking to me last week. During a long car ride I suggested quizzing her on literature vocab words for her upcoming mid-terms, knowing that concentrated study time at home needs to go to her four AP classes. She reluctantly pulled out the flash cards she made for the test, and I asked her, “What is ‘arduous’?” “Um, is it like when, sort of, you…uggh…I don’t know.”

I lost it. “‘Arduous’—you take all these hard classes and you don’t know ‘arduous’? Are you kidding me?” Then it got worse, and as usual, I ended with, “I’m blocking your Facebook.”

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