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Three Irish Kids are Changing How We View Scientific Breakthroughs

The winning project from this year’s Google Science Fair could help combat famine around the world.

When kids win a science fair, it’s usually cause for local pride and platitudes about encouraging the scientists of the future. But last month, media outlets around the world lit up over the victory of three 16-year-old Irish girls, Sophie Healy-Thow, Émer Hickey, and Clara Judge of the small town of Kinsale, at the 2014 Google Science Fair.

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High School Science Fair Winner Might Revolutionize Internet Search

Seventeen-year-old Nicholas Schiefer has created a micro-search algorithm that makes it easier to find what you're looking for on the web.

If you've ever tried to search social media sites, you know how hard it is to get accurate results. Well, thanks to 17-year-old Canadian high school student, Nicholas Schiefer, that problem could soon be a thing of the past. Schiefer won the gold medal at the recent Canada-Wide Science Fair for his invention Apodora, a program that uses a special micro search algorithm that analyzes sentence context "to discern and exploit the relationships between words so people can get better search results."

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Who Runs the World? Three Girls Sweep Google's Science Fair

Three young American women, Lauren Hodge, Naomi Shah and Shree Bose won Google's global science competition.


It turns out that when Beyoncé sings that girls run the world, she might be right. They're at least running the Google Science Fair world. On Tuesday three young American women, Lauren Hodge, Naomi Shah, and Shree Bose, smashed the stereotype that only boys are good at science and became the winners of Google's inaugural science competition.

The Google "judges said the unifying elements of all three young women were their intellectual curiosity, their tenaciousness and their ambition to use science to find solutions to big problems." They beat out "over 7,500 entries from more than 10,000 young scientists in over 90 countries around the world," and their projects are undeniably impressive.

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