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“Rent a Husband” in Moscow

The city will begin offering “husband” services to its residents.

Photo by Flickr user JD Hancock.

The city of Moscow will soon be launching a “Rent-a-Husband” program, available to its residents as a public service. Taking a cue from private companies that already provide these kinds of services to Russian consumers, the administration’s Rent-a-Husband plan will loan out “husbands” for tasks traditionally carried by men to paying customers. Need a leaky pipe plugged up? Have a broken window that needs to be replaced? These husbands will not only fix things around your house but also perform uncompromising binary expressions of gender and masculinity!

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Students in Tennessee and Chicago won’t have to wait for President Obama’s College Promise proposal for free community college to pass. The Chicago Star Scholarships and the Tennessee Promise program, both of which offer a serious financial break for college students, will kick off this fall, giving qualified applicants a chance to progress without the economic stress.

Image by Flickr user velkr0 via Creative Commons

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Twitter Commemorates Roe v. Wade With #7in10forRoe

On the 42nd anniversary of the decision making abortion legal in the U.S., a social media push shows support for reproductive rights.

On the 42nd anniversary of Roe v. Wade, House Republicans pushed legislation through that would permanently ban the use of taxpayer funding for abortions. While their initial plans to vote on a bill that would have effectively prohibited abortions after the 20 week mark were scrapped in light of women in the party arguing that the bill did nothing to consider victims of rape, this smaller measure is just as disheartening for pro-choice supporters everywhere. NARAL Pro-choice America took to Twitter to ask its followers why they stand with the 70 percent of Americans who support Roe v. Wade, using the hashtag #7in10forRoe. Here are some choice tweets:

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The Year I Stopped Looking For a Script and Learned How to Improvise

Learning to improvise can be tough when the road to success seems like one big script.


I have always wanted to play jazz. I found the rhythms difficult to master, and the unscripted improvisations made me uncomfortable. As a flute player, I kept firmly to classically scripted scores through my collegiate years. The most improvised thing that I did was switch to playing the sousaphone in college marching band. While it was challenging and different, I still played off of a scripted and memorized sheet of music. During one brief, brilliant moment living in Morocco, I played with a big band jazz pickup group—a virtual United Nations of musicians from all over the world. But even then, I must be honest, I hid my meek flute sound, afraid of being heard making mistakes.

I recently conducted a retrospective on my career to give a presentation for colleagues new to public service. When I looked back from college, through graduate school, to a career in public service and international relations, I have constantly looked for that compelling scripted score to follow.

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[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3K-sJ5JdQ_k
This week, the American Independence Day falls just as Congress works to pass a new immigration law from the Senate to the House of Representatives. It’s a critical time for those who want our immigration laws to reflect the ideals of human rights and fairness on which our country was founded.

Tens of thousands of immigrants are trapped in the United States immigration detention system, and millions more are living in this country without legal status, fearing that they could be detained at any moment. They desperately need an immigration law that respects human rights.

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