GOOD

Budapest-based design student Barbara Bernát came up with a rather clever project for her master’s thesis at the University of West Hungary: a flora and fauna-inspired concept for the Hungarian euro (which does not currently exist). As Bernát’s fictional bills increase in value, so does their size—along with the size of the wildlife represented. (You’ll get a lizard for five Euros and a deer for 100. Flip them both over and you’ll go from grass to oak, respectively.)

When embarking on her project, Bernát decided to imitate an old technique for printing banknotes that’s still in process today, a method called intaglio printing. Though the aesthetic here is more stripped down than most actual currency—and thus seemingly easier to counterfeit—the concept’s security feature is the best part, revealing the skeleton of each animal under UV light.

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Learning by Doing: Harvard Reinvents the MBA

Forget about class lectures and theoretical case study analysis. The new MBA is a hands-on degree.


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Nohria told The Economist that one of the shortcomings of business school is that it doesn't help students gain practical experience that they can apply in real-world situations. And given the complex nature of the global economy and the needs of businesses, modern MBA graduates need to "master a body of knowledge" while also being able to "apply that knowledge with some measure of judgment," he says. A summer internship, Nohria adds, simply isn’t enough to help facilitate that process.

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Should Graduate Degrees Be Earned on Facebook?

30,000 users have tested out the Facebook Global M.B.A. degree. Would you enroll?

In The Social Network, Justin Timberlake, who plays Napster's founder Sean Parker, proclaims: "In the beginning we lived in caves. Then we lived in houses. Now, we’ll live on the Internet."

And now, apparently, we'll also earn graduate degrees on Facebook.

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Attention Prospective Grad School Students: the GRE's a Changin'

Applying to graduate school is totally en vogue these days for those seeking refuge from the current, inhospitable job market. If you count...

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