GOOD

How Two Environmentalists Are Bypassing Government to Fight for Water

Every year, the Goldman Environmental Prize honors six grassroots environmentalists. This year, two have been working for access to clean water.


Every year, the Goldman Environmental Prize, known as an honor for environmentalists on par with the Nobel or the Pulitzer, picks six grassroots leaders from around the world to celebrate and award for their work. This year’s recipients are fighting against a nickel mine, offshore oil and gas drilling, a highway that would bisect a local forest, and agrochemical spraying. And two are fighting for water. In Kenya, Ikal Angelei is battling a massive dam that would deprive the community in her arid region of water and of their livelihoods. In China, Ma Jun working to expose information about water pollution that has sickened people across the country.

Angelei comes from Kenya, in the region of the Lake Turkana Basin, where people depend on the lake to provide drinking water and to support fishing and farming. The Gibe 3 Dam would drop the water level in the lake by as much as 33 feet in the first five years after the dam goes into operation.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

After 24 Hours of Climate Reality, What Comes Next?

Al Gore said that the climate movement was growing “more rapidly than any grassroots movement ever.” But what will the movement do?


Eight million people had already tuned into Al Gore’s 24 Hours of Climate Reality before Gore himself took the stage in the 24th hour. During the 24-hour long marathon, Gore’s face had appeared periodically in the (for this viewer, often choppy) video stream to ask participants “Is your voice enough to dwarf established power?” and to promise them that “When enough people join, [the world] will change.” He said that the climate movement was growing “more rapidly than any grassroots movement ever.”

But in Montclair, New Jersey, a commuter town just outside New York City and an EPA Climate Showcase Community, the roughly 30 people that gathered in the town’s fire headquarters to watch the last hour of Gore’s presentation had already been converted to the cause. After all, they had shown up on the first chilly night of fall to sit in an air-conditioned room and watch a presentation they could have seen from their couch. Many of them were already actively pursuing green activities in their spare time: organizing film series, growing organic gardens, heading nonprofits that push for greener lifestyles.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles