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World’s Largest Indoor Vertical Garden Comes to the Garden State

The AeroFarms facility is bringing millions of pounds of leafy greens, and dozens of green jobs, to Newark.

AerFarms anticipated corporate HQ.

The tri-state area may be in the middle of what some in the Yiddish speaking community call a “massive shvitz” (learn the word, it will come in handy), but that isn’t stopping Newark mayor Ras J. Baraka from going out and getting down and dirty with nature. Tomorrow Baraka, along with acting governor Guadagno, will break ground for the world’s largest indoor vertical farm at the AeroFarms Headquarters at 212 Rome Street.

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Help Transform Times Square into a Forest

Bring green to Times Square that isn’t just dollar$.

Times Square has been through several iterations over the last few decades, morphing from smut kingdom into shiny, IRL Disney wonderland. But, if botanist and urban ecologist Marielle Anzelone gets her way, and we certainly hope she does, it might soon be transformed into a lush oasis. Anzelone recently launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise $25,000 by April 17 to transform part of the iconic neighborhood into a nature refuge, albeit temporarily. The installation, PopUP Forest: Times Square, would bring shipping containers of trees, flowers, and soil, along with the amplified sounds of recorded birds and wildlife, to the area—replacing the normal din of shouting cabbies, flapping pigeons, and lost tourists. It would also be part of a first step towards eventually creating a more permanent installation in the city. Anzelone, in an interview with Grist, said the goal of the project is to highlight the remaining natural areas of New York that desperately need our protection.

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By 2050, the Greenest City May Not Be in the First World

Cities might be burning three times more energy in 2050 than they did in 2005—unless they act now.

Currently, more than half of the world’s people live in cities. Given the trend of jobs returning to urban centers, it may not be surprising that by 2030 the world’s cities will be home to 60 percent of the world’s population. Cities are adapting to accommodate the growing population by becoming sustainable and green. In the U.S., these efforts include D.C.’s street car boom and San Francisco’s residents preferring public transportation to driving. European cities like London have implemented climate change initiatives such as increasing the number of parks in the city and retrofitting housing for water and energy efficiency.

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