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This Woman Can See Because Her Husband 3D-Printed Her Tumor

To help doctors remove his wife’s tumor, Michael Belzer printed them 3D model to practice on.

Pamela Shavaun Scott and her skull [via Make]

In William Gibson’s 2014 novel The Peripheral, the acclaimed author envisioned a not-too-distant future in which 3D printing is as ubiquitous for his characters as shopping at a convenience store is for us – where items as complicated and diverse as smartphones and designer drugs can be printed (“fabbed,” for “fabricated”) with ease. But that is science fiction, and we still live in a world of science fact, where, for most of us, 3D printing is not part of our everyday lives (...yet). Still, the technology has grown from an upscale – if fairly limited – hobby, to a serious tool for designers, engineers, and, in the case of one printing enthusiast, the means by which he helped save his wife’s eyesight.

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We tend to think of medical breakthroughs arriving in the form of a radically effective pill or a flawless diagnostic tool. But what if the next great innovation we need is a different way of interacting with patients?

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“There’s so much anxiety and fear in being an artist in this country to begin with, especially as you get older,” said Ken Bolden, a 53-year-old adjunct professor and actor. “For my friends who get married and start having children, not having health care is a real issue. So they start dropping out of the arts.”

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If there’s one thing you’d think American medical establishment would have a grip on, it would be keeping blood inside you. But you’d be mistaken!

An inexpensive, simple drug is helping save American soldiers in Afghanistan and Iraq. Tranexamic acid slows blood flow, giving emergency medical personnel more time to stabilize patients and treat injuries.

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