GOOD

Digital Boomtown: Online Learning Is on the Rise

A new report shows that the number of middle and high school students learning online has tripled over the past three years.

For today's middle and high school students, being online is nothing new—but there's a revolution happening when it comes to teens actually using the internet to learn. According to the just-released Learning in the 21st Century 2011 Trends report, the number of middle and high school students learning online is on the upswing and more than 40 percent of students now say online classes are an essential part of their school experience.

Keep Reading
Articles

Is 500 Words Enough for a College Application Essay?

Thanks to poor writing and too-long essays, the Common Application is capping word counts for this fall's crop of college applicants.

Could you write why a college should admit you instead of thousands of other applicants in 500 words or fewer? That's what this fall's crop of seniors applying to colleges using the Common Application, a standardized form that's accepted at over 400 schools, will need to do. According to the officials from the service, they're capping word counts on the essays for the first time in four years.

Keep Reading
Articles

Rejected From College: If You're a Woman, A Less-Qualified Man Probably Took Your Spot

Men are getting a leg up in the admissions game, all in favor of "gender balance."


With college acceptance letters hitting mailboxes in full force this month, high school seniors are either celebrating being accepted to their dream school, or learning to love the idea of attending a safety school. But, for female students rejected from private liberal arts institutions, that rejection might have happened precisely because they're female. Yes, so-called male affirmative action continues to roll on in private college admissions, and it's all, supposedly, in pursuit of gender balance.

The issue first came to the forefront back in 2006 in "To All the Girls I've Rejected" a New York Times op-ed by Kenyon College dean of admissions and financial aid Jennifer Britz. Britz described the real angst of sitting in a room of admissions officers rejecting women in favor of sometimes less-stellar male applicants all because of school's desire for gender balance. Women earn 57 percent of bachelor's degrees and, if admitted according to merit, they'd easily be two-thirds (or more) of the students on a given campus. Apparently, in pursuit of diversity, campuses don't want the student body to be more than 60 percent women.

Keep Reading
Articles