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Is Online Standardized Testing the Key to Ending Cheating?

In the wake of Atlanta's massive scandal, why aren't more states copying the SAT and GRE and moving their high stakes tests online?



With 178 educators implicated in Atlanta's massive standardized test cheating scandal, the integrity of high-stakes testing is coming under scrutiny. At the heart of the scandal: The allegation that teachers, school testing coordinators and principals erased student's incorrect answers and bubbled in correct responses. Atlanta isn't alone.

In my days working in schools, many teachers told me a similar story: Students they knew couldn't read on grade level somehow scored well on the reading comprehension sections of state tests. These teachers assumed that someone had gone through the testing booklet, erased the wrong answers, and penciled in the correct ones. Erasure patterns suggest that similar activity is happening in schools from Washington, D.C. to Houston.

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Do We Need to Ditch High-Stakes Testing to Compete with China?

Forget memorization and do-or-die, high-stakes testing. China's ditching those old schooling methods. Just as we're using them more than ever.

At a time when international test results—like last year's PISA data—seem to indicate that American students are falling behind their Chinese counterparts, we're feeling the pressure to adopt a stereotypically Chinese method of educating kids: lots of rote memorization of facts and hardcore standardized testing. But in a recent interview with Education News, Minxuan Zhang, the Director-General of the Center for International Education Studies, Ministry of Education, China, and National Project Manager of PISA, says that the Chinese vision of education no longer includes those kinds of rigid practices. Instead, China's moving away from rote learning.

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Two Angry Teachers Protest California's Standardized Testing with Another Music Video

It's standardized testing time in California, which means the anonymous pink-slipped duo Two Angry Teachers and a Microphone are back with...

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cnRYZ5bN-c

It's standardized testing time in California, which means the anonymous pink-slipped duo Two Angry Teachers and a Microphone are back with another track, "More Than A Test Score." In the almost four-minute song, the Los Angeles-based rapping educators break down how test prep has hijacked teaching, and criticize the push to determine school and teacher effectiveness from one high stakes test score.

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